Risk factors for osteoporosis include family history, tobacco use, certain medications, and body stature. Women in particular are at risk for osteoporosis though men can develop it as well.
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Who is at risk for osteoporosis? Female: Women are particularly at risk for osteoporosis, particularly post-menopausal women. What happens at the time of menopause is with the loss of estrogen, there's an acceleration of bone loss. Actually, peak bone mass occurs at about the age of 30. After 30 there's a gradual decline in bone density, particularly in women. And at the time of menopause, when there's the lost of estrogen input, there's an acceleration of bone loss. So, women who are post-menopausal are at an increase risk for developing osteoporosis. Men also can get osteoporosis and it typically happens in men later in life. So older men have an increase in their bone loss that it's actually not really known at what age that occurs. It's a little bit more clear cut for women. Now, there are other risk factors for us to process, aside from being a post-menopausal woman, the other risk factors are having a family history of osteoporosis or being of small body stature, which is actually defined as weighing less than 127 pounds. Another risk factor would be tobacco use. And another risk factor would be if a patient has, already had what's called an insufficiency fracture or somebody who has a fracture that’s not related to a traumatic event. Then that person has increase risk for further fracture. And then another thing that puts patients at risk for osteoporosis would be certain medications. The most common medications to think about would be medicines that are used to treat seizure disorders, prednisone or other steroid medications that are used to treat all sorts of inflammatory disorders. Some of the medications that are used to treat breast cancer can put patients at risk for developing osteoporosis.

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