Osteopathy for Children Video

In this video, we see an overview of osteopathy in children.
Read the full transcript »

Emma Howard: So, welcome back to Baby Talk with me Emma Howard. A little later on, we will be delving into the mail bag once more to answer your questions by Midwest Su McDonald but before that here is a look at how Steven Mathews got home when she visited the Osteopathic Centre for Children. Female Speaker: This complementary therapy is increasingly popular as a way of treating a whole range of baby and toddler problems. Teething, windy or irritable babies can all be helped. As many new parents sway by osteopathy as a way of health in common ailments, so how does it work? Karen Carroll: If you think about all of osteopathy, pediatric osteopathy is just a osteopathy we are doing it on small people who are slightly different to big people but it’s the same principle. So osteopathy is really looking at structure and function and movement. So what we were interested in is how a structure effects of function, how the function affects a structure and how everything moves in relation to everything else and so what we are doing is looking at those complex relationships whether its with the bones of the head which is sometimes that something we will focus on with babies or whether its if you got baby who doesn’t crawl properly whether its through the bones of the pelvis somehow the lower extremities the legs are actually moving and hormones effecting the balance through the pelvis so how is that muscles affecting that balance. And if baby comes out for example that’s been quite compressed or quite tight and quite tightly packed then certain areas may be compressed and that can effect movement and balance if they had one leg very tightly tucked up that can effect the hip balance so we will looking all of those things, assessing all of those things and then very gently encouraging the body to correct because everything has a blueprint from health and what’s lucky for us is that baby is a very much closer to that blueprint than as we are as adults we haven’t handled those, of palsy and knocks pastro bad habits. So, with the baby being that close, some of the child being that close, it’s a lot easier to reestablish that help and patterns for movement whether that baby already has. Female Speaker: Karen Carroll is a consultant pediatric osteopathic at the Osteopathic Centre for Children based in North London and Manchester. It was set off as a charity 15 years ago to make the pediatric osteopathy available to all the children regardless of the family’s financial circumstances. Karen Carroll: Well, we don’t turn any patients away because they can’t pay. Patients are asked to pay what they can afford and some patients pay a few pounds or nothing and some patients pay more than that. I don’t know what an average donation is but patients are just encouraged to pay what they can pay at the time. Female Speaker: All osteopaths undergo four years of medical training under that OCC. They also complete a two year diploma in pediatric osteopathy. The minute you walk in to the center, you know you have come somewhere to put children first. Tessa Adie: Nothing is too much trouble, come here everything is done at the child’s speed, it’s very unstressable, very non-invasive unlike physiotherapy with a pulled and push where they don’t want to go. Female Speaker 2: It’s just so much more relaxed and least crying at time, he doesn’t and he is trying to use the arms more and he just left to be inherent. Female Speaker 3: Its like a magic work, I don’t know what they do, I don’t know how it happens but that’s the results. Female Speaker: Taking an alternative route to when your child has a health problem can be a bit daunting and its often hard to find guidelines outside of seeing your GP. Osteopathy however is now so regularly used and so often recommended by doctors but it’s virtually mainstream what isn’t so well known is just how beneficial osteopathy can be for babies and children. The variety of problems that pediatric osteopaths can treat is extraord

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