A new study shows one-third of U.S. children are overweight and at risk of Type 2 diabetes.
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  Image Source: Healthy Body Project BY LUKE LEONARD ANCHOR ANA COMPAIN-ROMERO   America’s youth are becoming less and less healthy. A new study shows that type 2 diabetes has become a serious risk for the youth of America.  KOVR say s it’s a national crisis. “Kids are now getting adult onset diabetes and we’re seeing cirrhosis in 5 year olds, strokes in 8 year olds, we’re seeing kids who have heart attacks at 20 years old. We have a national crisis and we need to think about solving this in a different way.” WFXT spoke  to a diabetes professional who suggests that the increase in rates of diabetes among young people may not necessarily be climbing. Rather, parents are becoming aware of symptoms and is leading to an increase in the amount of young people diagnosed.   “With our obesity increase, our lack of activity the meal plans and super sizes that we’re all looking at i think we’ve forced ourselves into a situation where we probably need to pay attention.” Paul Zimmet from the International Diabetes Federation , tells Bloomberg prevention  is the best possible course of action. “We don't have a solution to this except to do better things about prevention ... Adults may understand better that this is a life-long disease ... It’s very hard to tell a 12-year-old that they're going to be on medication for the rest of their life.” Prevention during the early decades in life is even more crucial. According to a repor t by The New York Times, those  children who are affected so early on in their lives are at an even greater risk than adults with type 2 diabetes. “The findings could signal trouble ahead, because poorly controlled diabetes significantly increases the risk of heart disease, eye problems, nerve damage, amputations and kidney failure. The longer a person has the disease, the greater the risk. So in theory, people who develop diabetes as children may suffer its complications much earlier in life than did previous generations who became diabetic as adults.” Medscape says that 50 years ago  young people were never affected by the then called adult-onset diabetes due to their lower calorie and more physically active lifestyles, however, it’s time American youth started making healthier choices.    

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