Patrick explains how to safely fall through inversions, so that you can have the confidence to get away from the crutch of the wall. **Be safe everyone, don't try any of these until you are comfortable and experienced with inverted poses** http://w
Read the full transcript »

Patrick: Hi, this is Patrick from Yoga Garden. There is nothing quite like the feeling of doing a headstand or a handstand in the center of the room, if only your body and your concentration keeping you in the pose. The energy, the excitement, the feeling of flight, are all really great. But of course, before we do things in the middle of the room or outside, in the middle of the park, we have to learn on the wall. However, I have noticed that a lot of students never really get off the wall. They are, kind of, parked on it for years at a time, in these inverted poses. The wall is a great way to learn, but it's not the final expression of the pose. We don't want to be chained to the wall; we don't want to not be able to do the pose without a wall on your back. Remember, the wall is just a prop, like a block or a strap, and when the time is right, you should try to work on these poses without the wall. Of course, this is really hard for people because they are afraid of falling over and breaking their necks without the wall there to support them. This is a perfectly reasonable fear, but in this video I am going to try to show you some techniques, so you can get off the wall, face your fear, and learn how to fall if things go wrong, with safety. In order to explain these principles, I am going to have to go where no yoga teacher has ever been before. That's right, it's NASCAR. I am not a NASCAR fan, I don't really know anything about it, but I do know a good chance to explain some physical properties of crashes. So what we are going to do is we are going to take a look at two crashes and try to understand how they work and what the consequences of them were. Here is the first one. Commentator: Qualifying for NASCAR. Michael McDowell. Car gets loose, he loses control, hits the wall, flips multiple times, he rolls, catches fire. Wow! Patrick: Yes, well, indeed. That's a crazy crash, but is the driver okay? Oh, look at that, the guy is walking; he doesn't have a scratch on him after all that. That's crazy. Let's look at this crash. Commentator: The black number 3 car, Earnhardt, just pushed a little bit initially and then collected by Ken Schrader, as he went up into the wall, and that was the accident that was to claim Dale Earnhardt's life. Patrick: Uh, say what, he died? That wasn't anything compared to the first one. Look at this, this guy is like flipping, his car catches on fire. The thing is disintegrating in a million pieces and he gets out without a scratch. But in the second crash, doesn't look anything, he gets a little tap on his bumper and hits the wall, and that's it. I don't understand, what's happening here. Well, the answer is that, in the first crash, the energy of the impact is scattered, it's scattered to the outside, it's flipping, it's catching on fire, things are falling apart, but the impact is not going into the driver, he is just along for the ride. However in the Earnhardt crash, all of the force of the impact goes into the car and into Earnhardt himself, and ultimately it broke his neck and that's what killed him. So the lesson here is that when we fall, we need to somehow transfer the energy into motion, rather than a jarring shock to our bodies. Let's do this headstand. I am going to do this improperly now. As I fall, oh, all of the energy goes into my hips as I attach it into my back. This is really interesting, watch this. Falling, you can actually see the shock wave go through my body. Here it is in slow motion again. Alright, and one more time, a little slower. As I fall, my back is flat and the impact goes straight into my spine. You can even see a little shock wave going along my t-shirt there. That is not good. That means I took the brunt of all that. So here is a much safer way. As I fall, curving the back with a roll through. Make the body into a ball, and dissipate the energy into a forward roll. Totally safe, no danger to the neck. Now, the technique here is a little tricky. As you st

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement