This medical video explores the latest version of the Octopus, a popular device designed to stabilize coronary artery during the distal anastomosis in the off-pump coronary artery bypass procedures.
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Jennifer Matthews: Not long ago, playing with his dog took all the strength Larry Olson had. Larry Olson: You're tired, you know, it's something you're not used to being -- 'cause I always had a lot of energy, and different things would make me tired, so I'd have to rest. Jennifer Matthews: He had atherosclerosis that restricted blood flow to his heart. For the quadruple bypass surgery Larry needed, Doctor Ken Ashton used this instrument -- the octopus -- while Larry's heart was still beating. Doctor Ashton says the octopus is better than the standard heart-lung machine. Dr. Ken Ashton: The beating heart method allows us to do much the same operation but hopefully minimize any of the risks of going on the heart-lung machine. Jennifer Matthews: Just like an octopus, the device suctions itself to the heart. It keeps the portion of the heart that's being worked on steady while the rest of the heart continues to beat. That allows oxygenated blood to flow through the body. It creates less blood loss and gets patients back on their feet sooner. Dr. Ken Ashton: I believe that it lessens the complication rate and improves recovery time, so I'm a strong proponent of the off pump surgery. Jennifer Matthews: Patients like Larry get back to their daily routine faster -- and healthier. Larry Olson: I have no aches and pains at all of any kind, and I can do whatever I want to do, and it came out really good. Jennifer Matthews: This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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