This medical video looks into how video games can detect if you have a lazy eye.
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Jennifer Mathews: Grant Hick loves to play games, especially baseball. Until recently, Grant had a hard time keeping his eye on the ball. Grant Hick: I could see it, but there would be like two of the ball just coming at me. Jennifer Mathews: So Grant took his game inside. He tested a new video game that would check his vision. Dr. Jim O'Neil created the game that uses 3D glasses and a computer to detect a serious vision problem known as lazy eye. Lazy eye results when one eye works harder than the other. If it's not detected early, the brain literally trains itself to not use the eye at all. It can lead to blindness. As the game goes on, the letters change and get smaller. At the end, a report is printed for the doctor. Dr. Jim O'Neil: After a child is 9 or 10-years-old, the vision system is cemented in place, and if they haven't learned to use their eyes in a normal fashion by that age, then the vision loss is permanent and irreversible. Jennifer Mathews: One in 20 kids has a lazy eye, and it's something you may not be able to see. If it's not corrected early, the damage is irreversible. That's why this game is targeted to children as young as little Katie. Dr. Jim O'Neil: Are you ready to get your vision checked? Jennifer Mathews: This 5-year-old breezes through the test. Katie's eyes are fine. Grant did have lazy eye but caught his problem in time. He is now back on the ballfield. This is Jennifer Mathews reporting.

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