In this medical video learn how this present invention can help detect early sighs of Cancer.
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Jennifer Matthews: Only 14 percent of lung cancer patients make it to the five-year mark, so Chuck Waser knows he's lucky to be alive. Chuck Waser: It's been, in some respects, nothing short of a miracle. Jennifer Matthews: After nearly two years of treatment Waser is cancer-free -- to celebrate, he got Lola. What happens in this lab at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., offers promise to other lung cancer patients. Dr. Edward Patz: So this case is a very good idea that proteins that we have to go after as potential targets for the lung caner cells. Jennifer Matthews: Researchers can identify the difference between normal and cancerous lung tissue by comparing proteins. Dr. Edward Patz: We hope that by understanding the proteins in the cell, then we will be able to understand why a cell acts a certain way. For instance, why a cell turns into a cancerous cell and what makes it a cancerous cell. Dr. Michael Campa: So what this may allow us to do is to tailor therapy based on what exact type of tumor someone has. Chuck Waser: Certainly the earlier you catch it, the better chance you have of getting remission or effectively getting a cure. Jennifer Matthews: Chuck beat the odds and hopes this new research gives other patients that same chance. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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