Nocturnal Dialysis Video

This health video focuses on the benefits of having dialysis treatment at night verses the more conventional daytime treatment.
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Jennifer Matthews: Three and a half hours a day, three days a week, 223,000 people in the United States go through dialysis. Dr. Brent Miller: Basically it's 20 hours a week by the time you get to the center, they get you on the machine, they get you off the machine, you get home. Jennifer Matthews: And that's only one down side. For 48 hours or more, toxins build up in the body and in just three hours are sucked out. Patients are left exhausted and many with high blood pressure. Dr. Brent Miller: It's screaming for something to be better. Jennifer Matthews: Doctor Brent Miller may have something better. It's called nocturnal dialysis. Each night, as they sleep, patients dialyze for six to eight hours. Krista Havlin: You're not having a chance to get to that bad place and then rip it all off and then feel weak and listless and then start all over again. Jennifer Matthews: Now on dialysis for the third time, Krista Havlin dreaded traditional treatment. Krista Havlin: It was a joke, it was tiring, it was not a way to live. Jennifer Matthews: But with the new treatment? Krista Havlin: It's a hundred percent better than being in center. Jennifer Matthews: Despite concerns with the protocol, Doctor Miller says three benefits are indisputible. Dr. Brent Miller: You do it during the night. You have the whole day free. These patients can eat and drink anything they want. You go from 80 to 90 percent of patients having hypertension and having to take medication to 10 percent. Jennifer Matthews: For Krista, it meant a sweeter quality of life overall. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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