This medical video views the treatments available to get rid of your allergies.
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Jennifer Matthews: Fall is coming, and so is ragweed season. Oncology nurse Kim Brandt, is one of 36-million Americans allergic to the wild plant. . Kim Brandt: I would be sneezing, running, watery eyes, itchy nose and nasal congestion Jennifer Matthews: Sick of the symptoms, Kim joined a study on a new way to give rush immunotherapy. Mark Moss: Rush immunotherapy is a way of administering immunotherapy that condenses a large series of shots into a short period of time. Jennifer Matthews: Immunotherapy builds resistance to allergens. With standard therapy, patients need weekly shots for up to six months. With rush immunotherapy, it's done much faster. Mark Moss: This could be - theoretically, it could be done in about two to three weeks. Jennifer Matthews: But it's risky. Patients have severe allergic reactions one-third of the time. In this new study, patients were pre-medicated with the anti-allergy drug omalizumab before starting the immunotherapy. Mark Moss: They had a five-times lower chance of having a reaction compared to the group that received the rush immunotherapy alone Jennifer Matthews: That pre-treatment also led to better symptom relief. Kim got the treatment three years ago. Kim Brandt: I have had three consecutive years of no symptoms. So if you ask me what it has done for me, it has improved my quality of life 100 percent. Jennifer Matthews: And ready to get to back to what she does best. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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