This health video focuses on the new screening being used to detect earlier forms of ovarian Cancer.
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Jennifer Matthews: Diane Miller lives in fear ... a fear of cancer. Her father had colon cancer. Her sister died of lung cancer, and her twin sister had brain cancer. Diane Miller: There was just something bothering me. Jennifer Matthews: She had an exam and blood test called the CA-125 to check for ovarian cancer. It was negative. But she pushed her doctor to remove her ovaries because the test is only accurate about 60 percent of the time. After surgery, she got the news, she had ovarian cancer. Diane Miller: I'm one of the lucky ones because it was found real early, stage 1, almost unheard of. Jennifer Matthews: Diane prognosis is good because the cancer was caught before it spread. That's not the case for most women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Patricia Kruk: Unfortunately, there are no reliable, accurate ways to detect all ovarian cancers. Jennifer Matthews: But researcher Patricia Kruk and her team may have found one. They looked at a protein in the urine called the BCL-2 and studied samples from women with and without ovarian cancer. Patricia Kruk: Regardless of the stage, the BCL-2 urinary levels were at least 10-times greater than women without ovarian cancer. Jennifer Matthews: And the results were more than 90 percent accurate. Patricia Kruk: It might become the standard for ovarian cancer, for example, like mammograms are for breast cancer or Pap tests are for cervical cancer. Diane Miller: If research can come up with something to determine this cancer early, women will have a chance. I have a chance, and I'm grateful. Jennifer Matthews: And she wants to give back, Diane journals her story in hopes to educate other women about this silent killer. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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