The VivoSight laser light device scans beneath the skin's surface to detect sun damage and skin cancer that the naked eye might miss. 
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New Laser Scanner to Detect Skin Cancer Travis: Joining Dr. Ordon in our exam room is Medical Applications Director for Michelson Diagnostics, Gordon McKenzie who is here to talk about the VivoSight Machine. Andrew: I'm personally very excited about this. I take care of a lot of skin cancers in my practice and this particular technology may give us something that we’ve never had before. Tell us all about it. Gordon: Okay, so VivoSight is essentially a laser ultrasound machine, it works on the same principle as ultrasound. It let’s us see into the skin that uses a low powered laser, about the same wave length as your TV remote control. And the advances that gives us, is it gives us about 20 times the resolution that ultrasound would have. Andrew: Do you want to show us or demonstrate. Gordon: I would be very happy too, yeah. Andrew: What we’ll see here. Gordon: Absolutely, yeah. Andrew: Since we have this great machine with us here today, why don’t we got somebody from the audience? We’re going to try it out on them. Do we have anybody here that? Boy, your hand went up quickly. Relax, we’ll just check out your skin. Come on up. Hi, there how are you? Rella: Hello. Andrew: Have a seat right here. Well, this is Gordon and I’m Dr. Ordon. Welcome, and what is your name? Rella: My name is Rella. Andrew: Alright, well we need to check your skin. She looks like a good candidate to¿ Gordon: Absolutely. Andrew: Try this out on her. Gordon: So we have the hand piece, this doesn’t hurt. It’s just a low powered laser. So, if we put this on your skin, you can immediate, you get a cross section of the skin. Where you're getting about a millimeter and a half down into the skin and we’re not just looking at the surface. If I freeze that, this looks like at first glance a pretty good example of pretty normal skin. On the top here, you can see the tratum corneum which is the layer on the outside of the skin that’s so thin you can’t really see it. That’s normal. Your dermal epidermal junction running on here, that is visible and constant all the way through. But one thing I am seeing is there are quite a few sorts of blood vessels that are more prominent than you might normally expect. Now, that’s probably an early indication of sun damage. When we get more elderly patients, the people that are actually going on to having basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinomas, that sort of sun damage could be really, really prevalent. This is an indication you may be getting a little too much sun. Andrew: Rella, you know what you have to do. You have to wear that sunscreen. Protect right, and you need to go see your dermatologist at least once a year to check any moles that are changing and you need to watch your moles also. But Gordon, you actually have something to show us the difference between. Gordon: Yeah, absolutely. Andrew: A normal appearing skin and a cancerous. Gordon: Yeah, sure I mean this is a typical, normal skin taken from an elderly patient. So you can see here the vessels really are large. The very early effects we’ve seen here are sort of variable piece but this still “normal skin” whereas this was a patient that we had in who have had photodynamic therapy and it didn’t feel right. And you can see there is a cancer nest here that wasn’t visible from the surface but was there. The patient couldn’t feel it wasn’t right. They were able to treat that again. It went away but you can see, we can see the stuff that’s underneath the surface of the skin. We get a better idea of what’s going on. Andrew: These is good stuff and thank Rella for coming up.

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