In this health video learn about a new drug targets the destructive white blood cells in multiple sclerosis patients and could stop the disease in its tracks.
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Jennifer Mathews: Each day, Maria Rios prays the same prayer. Maria Rios: Lord, you gave me this. You will see me through it. Just, please, hold my hand and walk with me. Jennifer Mathews: Last year, Doctor Daniel Jacobs confirmed the pain and fatigue Maria suffers from is caused by Multiple Sclerosis. Maria Rios: There's days that I feel great. There's days I can't get out of bed. Jennifer Mathews: Maria is in the early stages of MS, and she hasn't yet received the standard drug treatments to slow its debilitating effects. For this reason, her doctor says she's a prime candidate to participate in a study of this new drug, called CAMPATH-1H. Daniel Jacobs: New treatments are desperately needed. Jennifer Mathews: This MRI shows visible white spots or plaques in the brain. They form when the protective myelin covering the nerves is destroyed by white blood cells. CAMPATH-1H targets those destructive white blood cells. Daniel Jacobs: We have the chance to stop the disease in it's tracks and prevent disability at 5, 10, 20, or 25 years down the road. Jennifer Mathews: For Maria, the new drug might be the miracle she's been praying for. But, if it's not, she'll continue to rely on her faith. Maria Rios: Even if I'm crippled, even if I can't move from a bed, I'm alive, and that's what counts. Jennifer Mathews: This is Jennifer Mathews reporting.

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