The health video takes a look at the advancement in fetal monitors.
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Jennifer Matthews: 10-month-old Wyatt is perfectly healthy now, but there were some tough moments during his delivery. Gina Hampton: Wyatt's heart rate would start dropping to the 40s and 50s, and they'd all come rushing into the room, 'oh, you gotta move,' and I had had an epidural at that point, and of course, I couldn't move. Jennifer Matthews: Doctors told Gina about a new type of fetal heart monitor. Standard ones look at the baby's heart rate and the mother's contractions. The new monitor -- called STAN S-21 -- does more. Gina Hampton: The way it was explained to me was it was like you and I having an EKG. Jennifer Matthews: Doctor Lawrence DeVoe says standard monitors only show if a baby is very healthy or very sick. Dr. Lawrence DeVoe: In between, there are a lot of babies that the monitoring patterns create a sense of uncertainty about the condition of the baby. Jennifer Matthews: The new monitor lets doctors know that oxygen is being delivered to the heart and the brain. Dr. Lawrence Devoe: What we can do is look at the baby's cardiogram and look for some of the same kinds of changes, and it would tell us either the heart is getting enough oxygen or it's not. Jennifer Matthews: Studies of the monitor in Europe show a 50 percent reduction in babies born with oxygen-related problems and a 20 percent reduction in unnecessary C-sections. Dr. Lawrence Devoe: In my experience, which is only 37 years, that this is one of the most significant events and developments in antepartum care that I have ever seen. Jennifer Matthews: And little Wyatt is living proof that it works. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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