In this medical health video meet NARSAD, working in alliance with Ivanhoe to educate consumers about mental illness. View clips from the NARSAD Annual Symposium and Gala, featuring interviews with leading psychiatrists, and an appearance by Larry
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Female Speaker: The National Institute of Mental Health estimates one in four Americans over the age of 18 suffer from some type of mental health disorder and children are not far behind. An estimated one in five has some type of brain or behavioral disorder. At NARSAD our mission is to focus attention on these often overlooked conditions and to increase funding for breakthrough research on their causes, treatment and prevention. Recently NARSAD gathered a panel of several of the nation's leading experts in mental health for symposium on childhood and adolescent mental health. More than 300 people turned out for the advent in Palm Beach, Florida to hear about some of the latest research on autism, childhood depression, pediatric anxiety and eating disorders. Speaking on these topics were Dr. Fred R Volkmar, Head of the Child Study Center at Yale University, Dr. Maria Kovacs of the University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Daniel Pine of National institute of Mental Health and Dr. B Timothy Walsh of Columbia University. Dr. Thomas Insel: We often don't recognize the tremendous public health burden that results from mental illness in general, whether we're taking about schizophrenia, bipolar illness, depression, autism, the whole range of disorders that the World Health Organization now sees as their number one source of medical disability between the ages of 15 and 44 for Americans. It's really quite striking. It means that it's a greater source of public health disability of burden of disease, as the World Health Organization calls it, then diabetes, cancer, heart disease, stroke, many of the major killers. Dr. Fred R Volkmar: More and more children with autism are doing very well, they are living independently and self-sufficiently and that's really been a remarkable phenomenon over the last 20 years. Dr. Maria Kovacs: Over the last 10-15 years, I think we had an understand that emotions can be regulated by the person, that you can change the intensity of your emotions and how long, how you feel certain emotions. Dr. Tim Walsh: The latest treatments for eating disorders really have to be divided between anorexia nervosa and bulimia, because it turns out interestingly that the two aren't quite the same in terms of what they respond to. Dr. Daniel Pine: The childhood anxiety problems are very good predictors of a range of adult problems with psychopathology and the two most common associations are with anxiety disorders in adulthood and different kinds of mood disorders in adulthood. And among the kinds of mood disorders, the strongest association is with major depression. Female Speaker: This symposium was part of a weekend of special activities that included NARSAD's Annual Palm Beach Fund Raising Gala. Where Mike Wallace, was on hand to honor his friend and CNN personality Larry King for his contribution to increasing public awareness about depression and bipolar disorder. Larry King: Well I knew something was a matter, and it was mostly -- the heart attack was the beginning of it, but then I had heart surgery and that's when it was, it was really bad for like 6-8 months, most people have depression for a lot longer than that, I was lucky. Female Speaker: The weekend was a success but it would not have been possible without the support of NARSAD's donors and volunteers. Since 1987, through the generosity of thousands of donors, NARSAD has given over $200 millions in grants to support innovative research on mental illnesses. Events like this symposium will help increase public support of research for years to come.

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