Myasthenia Gravis Acetylcholine Receptor AB Test Video

Cary D. Buckner, M.D. talks about Myasthenia Gravis diagnosis.
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Host: You excern on the patient, you see if there is that droopiness, the history seems to coincide what you said before that myasthenia gravis could be. What would do you to further make the diagnosis? Male: Sure, and I think you lead with a very good question because really the most important thing is the physician sitting down with the patient asking them questions about their symptoms and then examining them. That’s really the key to the diagnosis. In all medical specialties but especially in neurology one of the reasons I loved it so much. After you do that and you're convinced from a clinical standpoint that this is myasthenia gravis there are several tests that you can help you conform. To the first test, I should check is called to measure the levels of acetylcholine receptor in the body. And for that one of the things about myasthenia gravis that’s very exciting is that there are always new things being discovered about it. When I first learned about it, it was the acetylcholine receptor antibody and that’s all it was. But there are several antibodies that can affect the acetylcholine from several different ways. It combines to the acetylcholine receptor and just comes off again or it can block the neuromuscular, the acetylcholine receptor or it can actually change or what we call modulate it. So there’s binding and there's blocking and there’s modulating antibodies. So you have to send the blood test to a special lab who knows they know what they're doing and know how to measure that.

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