This health video looks at the advancements being made to help cure Malaria.
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Jennifer Mathews: How much do American travelers know about malaria? Female Speaker: Don't know much about it. Male Speaker: I don't know which viral or bacterial -- Female Speaker: I have no idea, I really don't. Jennifer Mathews: Dr. Donald Krogstad says, “Many Americans think malaria is a disease of the past.” But he's got news for the millions of Americans who travel overseas. Dr. Donald Krogstad: The mosquitoes which transmit malaria are still in the United States. So if you bring back people who have acquired an infection overseas, it can be transmitted. Jennifer Mathews: Each year, malaria infects about 1,500 Americans and more than 300 million people worldwide. It kills 3 million. Dr. Donald Krogstad: Drug resistance is the most important single driving force behind the worldwide reemergence of malaria. Jennifer Mathews: Dr. Krogstad has been researching malaria for 20 years. He has developed the drug AQ13 to treat drug-resistant forms. Dr. Donald Krogstad: It could have an enormous impact. Jennifer Mathews: Studies show the drug works against drug-resistant malaria. That's good news for Americans who plan on traveling to South America, Asia and Africa, all high-risk areas for malaria. Dr. Donald Krogstad: This does have the potential to put a truly affordable treatment in the hands of the people who need it the most. Jennifer Mathews: One treatment course of AQ13 costs just 0.09cents and could give people everywhere a fighting chance against this deadly disease. This is Jennifer Mathews reporting.

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