More About Triathlon-Targeted Nutrition Video

In this video is more valuable information about nutrition that will help you in triathlon training.
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I have got a friend who once did a race across America, the bike race and it takes like a week to get across the US and they are sleeping just a couple of hours of the time and they are back on the bike and since this is like, really kind of like a nightmare seems to me but the guys will do it and the gals that are really turned on by the thrill of the challenge and what he told me was that, you know, he had all these plans to take all this carbohydrates, he had gels and he had sports drinks and he had all those stuff he is going to eat this high carbohydrate stuff and once he got into it many, many hours into, a couple of days ended. All he wanted was fat. He craved hamburgers and french fries that's what he wanted all the time, potato chips. Now things were really, really high in fat and so his crew has going out to McDonald's and grabbing all this food for him. He was channeling down fat the entire time and most of the ultra marathoners I talk to these on the very, very long events, tell me something similar that they really crave fat on those events. We don't really know why, we still have not come across any research that would explain that but that seems to be what the body really wants on those very, very long events. Stage two: some problems, this is now said this is still during the race. Eating during event, problem nausea. This is a very common issue during a race at any distance, I have seen people get nauseous in sprint distance races and iron man distance races. Just pull over the side and toss their cookies. I saw last year at iron man Hawaii one of the top women in the world pulls over the side and she stand right in front of me, lean against the wall, barfing her guts out. This is not uncommon; this is a very common thing to see in events like we do. What causes this and how can we prevent it. The possible causes of it are: number one: poor pacing that is the number one cause I think. Usually early in the race, we are really excited, the adrenaline is pumping and we have got all these people around us who are racing with us, we have got crowds of people cheering and carrying on, we get all excited, we go out in the bike, our plan was to ride at 18 miles per hour roughly and then we look down and we are half hour into it and we will behold the ride at 23 miles an hour. That is not uncommon, I see it happen all the time. Even iron man distance races, we really get pumped up and going out way too hard and if they look the heart rate monitor, in the same situation, they would see their heart rate was sky high, they are probably anaerobic, they are ridding as if they are in 20 mile race but now they are doing 112 miles and so what has happened now is they become anaerobic. When you go anaerobic, the body just cannot afford to process anything you put into it and get food or drink, it just can't afford a bit. The only, the resources you have are going in to work. We are trying to deal with all the lactic we are creating now and the muscles that are working so hard so there is not much blood flow going to gut anymore. The blood flow is shut down to the gut and it goes now to the working muscles into the process and of all the byproducts of anaerobic exercise. And so because of that the athletes take in food and fluid and food and all the stuff early in the race and it all just begins to sit there just like a lump and it doesn't go any place and the next thing you know, they are nauseous. So the key to really, you know, really quite honestly, you can eat anything you wanted if you went slow enough and you could eat a state dinner, you know with potatoes and cabbages and all kind of stuff if you were going slow enough. So the issue is not what you ate, the issue is how fast are you going relatively what you are trying to eat. That's the issue. You got to learn to match those two together. What can you eat at the pace at what you are going. If you doing a sprint distance race in about an hour, it's a very, very fast

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