Moms Dealing with Stress Video

Dr. Georgia Witkin talks to three women about how they dealt with the stress of being a mother.
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Dr. Georgia Witkin: Hi, I'm Dr. Georgia Witkin. Kimberly Pauley: And I'm Kimberly Pauley. Dr. Georgia Witkin: And I'm Kimberly's mother. Kimberly Pauley: And I'm the mother of 2 boys. Dr. Georgia Witkin: Which makes me GG for Grandma Georgia. Kimberly Pauley: So, welcome to GG and Me. Dr. Georgia Witkin: We talked about everything. Kimberly Pauley: Well, the reason I talked to my mother about everything is that she's a professor of Psychiatry, professor of OB/Gyn, written 10 books on stress, and she's a Fox News contributor. Dr. Georgia Witkin: And Kimberly is a lawyer, a columnist, a college professor, and pregnant. Kimberly Pauley: So, we're going to be talking about pregnancy. Please join us. Dr. Georgia Witkin: Let's talk about the dreaded stress that everyone is worried about when they're pregnant, when they're having a baby, is the baby going to catch the stress, is the stress going to affect the pregnancy. Lisa Gyselen: Oh, we love this. Dr. Georgia Witkin: Yeah, okay, first let's introduce ourselves. Kimberly Pauley: Kimberly Pauley. I have 2 sons, and I'm pregnant with my 3rd son. Lisa Gyselen: Lisa Gyselen. I have a 5-year-old daughter and a 2-month-old daughter. Susan Krauss: Susan Krauss. I have a 3-year-old son and a 2-week-old son. Dr. Georgia Witkin: Okay, so you said you were just talking about stress. Susan Krauss: We were just talking-- Lisa Gyselen: The dreaded stress. Susan Krauss: -- about it. Dr. Georgia Witkin: Okay, so what we're saying-- Susan Krauss: Well, we were-- I think we were both sort of commensuration that we are bit anxiety-prone, that in general and some having going through a pregnancy and having a baby and all of that and that sort of escalating and trying to manage that with your, you know, around your children so that perhaps you don't pass that along, together we really we're talking about that is that something your kids feed upon and pick upon and how -- what are some ways to manage that better. Kimberly Pauley: I have to say that I'm usually not stress-- Susan Krauss: Right, yeah. Kimberly Pauley: But when I'm pregnant, once of my biggest stress is when I'm pregnant is that I worry from the minute I get pregnant to the minute the baby comes out that something could be wrong with the baby health-wise. Whether or not something is wrong with the baby, that's a completely separate issue. But the stress of worrying wall your pregnant because it's not something you can ever categorically know is so stressful to me. Susan Krauss: Uh huh. Lisa Gyselen: And I hear that from a lot of women-- Susan Krauss: Yeah. Lisa Gyselen: You are typically very calm. Amazingly, I, who worried about everything, was not stressed about the health of my child. Kimberly Pauley: Yeah. Susan Krauss: Uh huh. Lisa Gyselen: But I stressed about most other things, so it's interesting-- Kimberly Pauley: Yeah. Lisa Gyselen: where people place their stress. Dr. Georgia Witkin: Here's the formula, every time you sense of control or your ability to predict what's coming next goes down, stress goes up-- Susan Krauss: Exactly, goes up. Dr. Georgia Witkin: So whatever it is for you that you feel during pregnancy you're not in control of, and I-- my guess since you women who used to be in control, right? Susan Krauss: Right. Dr. Georgia Witkin: You did the education you needed and you work with you needed and you're just used to, if I take charge, everything will work out fine. Susan Krauss: Yeah. Dr. Georgia Witkin: And this is the one thing-- Susan Krauss: Yeah. Lisa Gyselen: There are no guarantees-- Dr. Georgia Witkin: Right. Susan Krauss: Yeah. Lisa Gyselen: despite all of our technology, there are no guarantees. Kimberly Pauley: And all the excitement I had when I was-- This is my 3rd, so when I was pregnant the first time, I think the excitement kind of over took the nervousness like giving birth and calling everyone for the first time, now I know exactly what labors anyway. Lisa Gyselen: You don't know what to expect

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