Molly and Disabled People in 1950s America Video

Learn about the history of shame and disability, and how to deal with disability in your family.
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“As I said before, you parents feel the need of post your videos in public of your disabled children for your won self-gratification. This is what use to happen to autistic children. If your already proud of your kids, then why can’t this be done in private? Keep it in the family Male: Molly was my sister. She would had a daughter for the first two and a half to three years that she was with us. Female: Molly adored Jeff and he adored her. It almost like he idolized her. Male: I think that Molly was born a parent’s thought, ”Boy, girl is the perfect American family”. Female: She was a darling baby. She has a little cast to her eye. Male: And I am afraid my mother probably looked to her and said “There is something wrong with you and I am not sure what it is” and I think worse yet she probably said to herself, “why is this happening to me?” Female: You did not educate those children. You were housed them. Male: And one day she is gone. I am six years old! Where she had go? Nobody told me. In 1957, when Jeff Daly was 6-years-old, his 2-eyar-old sister suddenly disappeared from his family. For nearly 50 years, Jeff and his family lived their lives as if his sister had never existed. One day, after both his parents had died, Jeff found the answer to the question he was not supposed to ask. Where’s Molly Male: Molly really was the rate of her family life and that was the choice of my parents. That was the choice of medical professionals that gave us. Give my parents directions what they should do, and they were told that they have to send Molly the way to the institution in the state of Morgan and that it was best to just forget about her and let the state take care of her in the world of the state. So consequently when we grew up, as I grew up as a child, we just never talked about Molly. That once in awhile I would find an old photograph perhaps in a conversation would come up for somebody of an old friend will mention Molly. And I do not so much remember the conversation of what was said about Molly but just sort of that it was just that we just worth to the talk about her anymore that Molly was oft to another spot that she was taking care of. So we really did not discuss Molly for decades many, many years. Molly live or has live in the world of the state as people do there in this group homes and many times there is not family involved which will helped make day to day decisions to them. Whether had to do with medical things or just day to day living? So we, we are excited that we are able to help her go on from day to day ventures that we are able to, be able to offer in put into her life and to her solemn life. What she has done for me has helped fulfill sort of a family circle and it is somebody has taken away for family but now she is back in and I am able to share a lot of things to talk that I have missed that in only years like birthdays and Christmases. Seen her for just a simple holiday, seen her for a simple weekend and it make a big deal, it makes a differ ventures. She enjoys the input of a family as we can all imagine and it makes a different in her life. It is s feeling of a big boy that she had a long time. You need to go and find the simple in or a person that was part of your family. That was sent away because a lot of times, these people who are sent away during the 50s and the 60s and that was encourage by the system of state that the government that we have an institutions this were people with disability should live and this is where they need to exist. And we found out that was really a mistake. Institution is not a good way of life for children or people with disabilities. That we need to incorporate them in the communities have them involved in community life styles. So if you think you might have somebody that it is in the institution, or in a group home, you just cannot realize how important, how great it would make you feel to have some contact with that person and it does not need to be a full ti

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