This health video is focusing on the new technologies that allow for mini hip replacements.
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Jennifer Matthews: Barbi martin is out shopping for the first time in six weeks. At 57-years old, Barbi was tired of being in pain. Barbi Martin: Christmas time came and I couldn't go shopping. And I used to go shopping with each of my kids, and we'd spend the whole day shopping, just girl stuff, and I couldn't do that. Jennifer Matthews: It was time for a new hip. But Barbi didn't get a standard hip replacement instead of a ten to twelve inch incision, hers would be just three to four inches. Dr. David Dore: It's just been phenomenal as far as how much easier it is on the patients. Jennifer Matthews: Doctor David Dore says the smaller incision means less cutting of the muscles, less blood loss and less pain but more work for the surgeon. Dr. David Dore: Technically it's more difficult. You're working through a much smaller hole. Jennifer Matthews: These tools are designed to help the surgeon work and see through the smaller opening. Dr. David Dore; You're now able to take a light source, snap it down in there so you can actually illuminate deep in the wound. I think as we make the procedure easier, it will become more acceptable by hip surgeons. Jennifer Matthews: Barbi has just a three and a half inch scar. But more than that, she says the surgery and recovery has been a cinch. Barbi Martin: I didn't have any pain. I kept waiting for the pain to come. Jennifer Matthews: A day out with her daughter is just the first step in Barbi's new beginning. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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