Microbes and Diseases Video

Throughout history, some of humanity's worst enemies have been infectious diseases caused by microbes - one-celled or small multicelled life forms.
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Paul Stoffeis: I’ve seen more people dying than most of the people in the rest of the world that ever have seen. I mean and that could makes a big impact on you. Julie Mchugh: HIV which is the real heritage behind to protect RND is a disease that has infected over 16 million people world wide. Paul Stoffeis: Where we are doing research on – we found that’s patients failed very rapidly on new drugs for one reason. The – became resistance within a few days. Julie Mchugh: Patients are waiting and then it has their building up resistance to their back bone therapist and running out of options. They’re literally running out of time. Roger Pomerantz: -- vertical with look at the different resistance mutants of HIV to different drugs and then would engineer a drug that could get those viruses. The example of which is Prezista which is not on the market. Paul Stoffeis: It took us just 20 years to I think bring it on a deadly disease to a chronic infection. At least in the West, we still have to do a lot of work to make sure this drugs become available globally. Julie Mchugh: But are challenge outside of the Western market sets not only develop and bring those products to market but also think about how we create meaningful access to this products in countries that have a limited affordability and in some cases no ability to pay. Roger Pomerantz: In the developing world, more people are still killed by infectious diseases than any other group of disease states. Paul Stoffeis: Tuberculosis today is the largest infectious disease in the world. So probably one-third of the world population in one and other way is affected by tuberculosis. Roger Pomerantz: We’re working on a drug that maybe the first new anti-tuberculosis drug in a half of century. Julie Mchugh: In addition, we’re moving aggressively into the field of hepatitis C. This is one of the most significant health issues across the globe in terms of just the number of patients affected a 170 million. Roger Pomerantz: We also have two other drugs against HIV. They’re called NNRTI’s that looks at another part of the virus. Another enzyme called the reversed transcriptase enzyme. Although we started with HIV, we now have a pipe line that sits in a lot of infectious diseases all of which are important for the planet. Paul Stoffeis: We live and work in a business but at the same time, we are human beings and as a group of human beings we can have a massive impact and every life you change, every life your impact that is where this is all about.

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