Gildea says Medicare Part D is a help in paying for her drugs, but isn't the answer.
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Ann Gildea: So I pay $10 a month to generic drugs, and then there's this kind of a sliding scale and that 20, 30 and sometimes more for the main drugs. Her Drug Cost: Ann Gildea: $500, $600, $700 a month. Host: $500, $600, $700 a month, and then before you hit the hole, it was reduced to -- Ann Gildea: It was reduced to about 20, because I do take some really expensive drugs. Host: Okay, and now you're paying up to $700? Ann Gildea: And now, I am back up to the $600 or $700. I mean it isn't that bad, because I have a pension and social security. So I am better off, then some of these other people, but it's still a big hunk. The Medicare Part D "Donut Hole". At about $2,5000, patients have to pay 100% of their prescription drugs cost until they've spent a set amount of out-of-pocket money. Ann Gildea: If I suffer, I don't think the Donut Hole should exists. I think that just should be wiped out. I think probably it's certainly a help. But I don't think it's the answer, and one thing that really upsets me is they won't pay it for breast exam for breast cancer. They won't wait for mammogram, because -- so of course if I get cancer they'll pay for that. All the 80% or whatever it is, but they won't pay for the mammogram to prevent the cancer, which really upsets me. Changes she would like to see: Ann Gildea: Frankly, yeah, they are on the drug companies -- I am with the lady who tried it first though. The drug companies lobbied for this with commission and President whoever and there's no reason for it. It should be covered all the way around for seniors . But I think and our add drugs are unbelievably priced. I have brought drugs in other countries, because I happen to be there, not over the kind of drugs I will say, I have never brought prescription drugs. The cost maybe a tenth of what we pay here. It's utterly ridiculous. And the other civilized and not civilized developed country has some type of medical insurance or socialized medicine whatever you want to call it, but we don't.

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