Learn why many patients with medical conditions that affect driving go unreported by physicians in this medical report.
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Dr. Susan Sharma: This is insidermedicine in 60. From Toronto, many patients with medical conditions that affect driving go unreported by physicians. In a study of over 1600 patients who presented to a trauma center following a motor vehicle accident, 37% had a reportable medical condition such as alcohol abuse, cardiac disease or neurological disorders. While 85% had seen a doctor within the preceding 12 months, only 3% had been reported to licensing authorities. From Washington, many medical schools in the US do not have a formal conflict of interest policy that guides how universities and their employees should interact with industry partners. In a survey of the Deans of 125 accredited medical schools in the US, 38% have adopted a policy covering financial interests held by the institution and 37% were working on one. Meanwhile, 25% didn't have one and were not developing one. And finally, from Minnesota, despite decades of declining incidence of heart disease, the results of an autopsy study show that the numbers are once again increasing. Researchers evaluating over 500 autopsies found that over the 20-year duration of the study, 8% had severe coronary artery disease and 83% had evidence of heart disease. Declines in the grade of coronary disease ended after 1995 and possibly reversed after 2000. For insidermedicine in 60, I'm Dr. Susan Sharma.

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