Making Casts of Your Baby's Hands Video

Magic Custard make lovely casts of your baby's hands and feet.
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Catrina Skepper: It won't be long before your cute little baby becomes rampaging naughty toddler. Well, the Magic Custard Company can't do anything about the behavior of your kids, but they can help to remind you how lovely your baby was when he was just a few months old. With one of their unique hands and feet casts. Martin Kern from the Magic Custard Company is here today to show how they make these great mementos of your baby's early days. Also with me is Mimi with her mom Stephanie Quante (ph). Thank you very much to all of you for coming here, especially to you Mimi because you don't know what's about to happen. Martin, tell us about, first of all, how did you set up the company? Why did you do it? Is it from wanting to have a memento of your own children? Martin Kern: That's exactly it! My son, like all other children, growing up very, very quickly and suddenly I realized that we were losing the uniqueness of him being so small. So, I thought of doing a hand cast of him, I knew how to do so because of my history, my background. So, technically I knew how. Catrina Skepper: Your background was in theatre making sets and things. Martin Kern: That's right, yes. Working with all sorts of different materials. So, I did a hand cast of him at home. And when I saw the results, I was so flabbergasted that I thought, My goodness! Other parents surely would like this. And that's how it was born. That's the way it was born. Catrina Skepper: And now Magic Custard is all around. But of course, it's a process which you have had to refine, because you couldn't just do it with ordinary plastic, this is not something that parents should try at home, in their back garden, right? Back shed? Martin Kern: Not unless they buy one of our kits that's specifically designed to do so, but no, I mean you have to use the correct materials. Catrina Skepper: Which is obviously meant to be unharmful to children and small babies. Martin Kern: Absolutely! The Magic Custard itself is a form of dental alginate. It's what dentists would use to take impressions of your teeth. So it's a medical product, it's been around for long time, very much tested, and very, very safe on children's hands and feet. Catrina Skepper: Now presumably, when you go around somebody's house, like in this case, we have got Mimi here, who is a willing customer, willing guinea pig. Do you take all the kit with you or is it already mixed? What's the process? Tell us, talk us through the process. Martin Kern: When we are going to a customer, primarily we will take samples of our whole range. So, customers get to choose exactly what they want to purchase. Catrina Skepper: Now range you are talking feet, hands, that's -- Martin Kern: Well both. Yes, I mean, we start off with casts that are made from, what we call cast stone and then they are painted like this. Catrina Skepper: Okay this is painted, this is not bronze. Martin Kern: That's right. That's actually a painted stone piece. Catrina Skepper: That's why it's so light. Martin Kern: Yes. And then they generally mount it into box frames and that's the kind of a final piece hung-up on the walls. But then, yes -- Catrina Skepper: This is behind glass obviously. Martin Kern: Exactly! That's right. Yes. Catrina Skepper: And that's you have got the date or the name of the child. Martin Kern: That's right. So, that would be a pair of hands, we also cast feet, pair of feet, or some parents like to have one of each in a box frame. Catrina Skepper: And what age would you say, what's the youngest that the child can be when you take this? Martin Kern: In fact, from prior to birth day oddly enough, we have done premature babies. I have been to hospitals and had to actually mold baby's in incubators. So, these are babies that are several weeks early and really I have molded tiny, tiny little feet which are then being turned in casts. So, the general answer is from birth day, but even prior to birthday with premature children, would say. Catrina

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