Learn about solo jump roping for fitness. Learn the basics and then progress to more advanced steps. Hosted by Max Wettstein and Stein Skaar.
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Male Speaker: We are in the cross overs. Max Wettstein: Alright, here we are from Encinitas again, Max Wettstein here, on my backyard skate ramp with Stein from Skaar Fitness, all the way down from San Francisco. We're going to do a little jump rope. Jump rope is a useful warm up for any other type of exercise. It can also be its own workout. It's kind of an aerobic form of working out, but it's great for foot work and agility. Stein? Stein Skaar: Yeah, I think that jump roping ends up being a really attractive option in terms of fitness just because of the fact that, pretty much -- I mean this is going to pack into any bag that you can take anywhere, you know, you want to go nationally, internationally anywhere. So it's sort of a no excuses form of fitness, it's really simple. What I have here is a Buddy Lee Jump Rope. It's fairly a high end jump rope, it's -- it is high end just because of the swivel system that it has here that's patented by this guy named Buddy Lee. So definitely check out Buddy Lee's website as well because he has some great jump roping stuff on there. But, at the same time, I mean you can buy jump ropes that are going to be less than $5 so. Max Wettstein: Yeah, that's the one I keep in my suitcase when I travel. Stein Skaar: I'll just go ahead and start with some two foot jumps here. When I first started jumping rope, I started by doing two foot jumps, but I could maybe barely put ten together. And really when people start, they'll start off with a rope behind them like this and they'll just start jumping through. When you're first starting, just doing this is going to be really hard, but if you can link together ten, say in a row, the next time you're going to go through -- maybe you're going to try to link a 11, and then 12 and etcetera until you're doing maybe 50 at a time and then a 100 at a time. But the main thing to remember with jump rope is, don't get frustrated because it takes a long time to learn, but at the same time if you dilge it and keep working on it, you're going to see improvements on a daily basis, which is one of the most gratifying things about jumping rope. So from doing simple jumps, you start to speed it up a little bit. You'll notice the one thing with my arms is they're no longer going around anymore, okay, that I am using more body tension and mainly my wrists to maintain the movement of the rope. The other thing you'll notice is, small jumps after the ground, trying to minimize the amount that I'm jumping up in the air. If I am jumping real high, I'd be using a lot of effort to do that, but keeping it nice and tight like this, you'll see that it goes nice and quick and I am able to sustain higher and higher revolutions per minute. From this point, it's fun just to play around with going to one foot. I think it's one of the most important progressions for a jumping rope is being able to jump on one foot and switching that up. When I first started doing that, I started it by doing one on the right foot, one on the left foot, two on the right foot, two on the left foot, and three and three, and four and four until I got to ten, and then I would back up, then go back down again. So, getting that movement of moving side-to-side with the rope means that you have to be able to get up on to one foot. By doing that, the amount of effort that you're putting into jumping rope becomes half because that you are getting a lot more efficient with your jumping. As I am jumping on one foot here, this other leg here is resting, alright. So one thing you'll notice that I do often when I'm jumping rope is jump side-to-side. You can take that as extreme as you want when you can start really moving side-to-side. I am getting the rhythm of jumping rope, same thing with two foot jumping. Here I'll go ahead and start doing some two foot jumps, nice and efficient jumps. You'll see both feet are leaving the ground simultaneously. Normally I'll start to getting into a side-to-side rhythm, one, two

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