Learn about Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome Andrew D. Blaufox, MD Pediatric Electrophysiology Schneider Children's Hospital . Associate Professor Clinical Pediatrics Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Medical School: Albert Einstein College of...
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Host: How do you refer to WPW as a short circuit type of mechanism of the heart and if you didn't have a cardiogram at a visit, there is no guarantee you would even see it, is that true? Andrew D. Blaufox: Well, if patient with WPW, the diagnosis is typically made on EKG, Electrocardiogram. Host: But is it always found in every visit? Andrew D. Blaufox: No, it may be intermittent in nature but in that case, when it is intermittent, it is not considered to be life threatening. Host: So, in other words, it is your cardiogram and if it is consistently there, that is a much bigger red flag than we see it occasionally, is that true? Andrew D. Blaufox: Yes, if you see it the first time, then there is a whole series of other tests that we typically do including a hall thermometer which is essentially a 24 hour EKG to see if it is persistent throughout the day and if it is, then have the child, if they are old enough to undergo exercise, treadmill or bicycle test to see if the WPW persists at higher mark rates. And if these things are true, then the patient may be at higher risk and will require more invasive testing and potentially a procedure to get rid of this extra connection.

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