Explore the health and wellbeing issues concerning wheat and windsurfing.
Read the full transcript »

Learn about Wheat and Windsurfing Host: The wheat-free diet trend is taking off the world. People are learning how to bake cakes without wheat and turn out a wheat-free bread loaf and biscuits. But people have been eating wheat since it was first domesticated in the Middle East over 8000 years ago. Why stop now? The wild indigenous wheat we were eating back then is a little different to the wheat we are eating now. Modern industrial wheat is bread for uniformity, high consistent yield and ultra disease resistance at the expense of richness of flavor and digestibility. Proteins from modern mega farm wheat are so strong. Some members of the community have troubles digesting them. Those suffering celiac disease have enzymes that don’t even recognize modern wheat proteins and thus don’t their digestive jobs properly leading the celiac patient with diarrhea, tummy pains and cramps. Agricultural scientists are trying to address this problem. They are striving to make the proteins in industrial crops more accessible and nourishing for the world. Dr. Zion Fahima: All over the world, the places especially the developing countries and especially children suffer from protein deficiency, 160 million are children all over the world suffer from protein deficiency. If we can improve the protein content of wheat we can improve the nutrition. Host: The race is on as Middle East and scientists strive to rediscover and protect indigenous wild wheat seeds too before their environment is lost to urbanization forever. A community based seed bank is being set up and it has hopes that soon the restoration of ancient wheat will be achieved so that future generations can enjoy the diverse flavors and the nutrients these aged old varieties have to offer. In the meantime, if you suffer wheat sensitivities try switching to spelt. This is the first of the ancient grains to make a reappearance on supermarket shows and the world was eating it up until about 150 years ago. Take to the sand and surf with a board and sail with nothing but the wind for fuel. Windsurf has begun popping up on beaches in great numbers in the 1980’s but the Polynesians have been doing it for fun and practical purposes for hundreds of years before that. It took an aeronautical engineer Jim Drake to come up with the functional lightweight windsurf design that we now see planing across the water on hot summer days. The sail size on a windsurf are various according to how fast you wanted it to go and how experienced that handling a rig you are. The sail is connected to the board by a universal joint, a joint that swivels in old directions. The sail is controlled by the sailor by a wishbone bone for easy grip and maneuverability. On windsurf you can perform jumps, loops and go free styling. You can even brave the biggest waves leaving most surfers behind in the backwash. When the wind is low the windsurfer will take you for a doe style cruise around the beach but when it reaches 15 knots or more the windsurfer lifts out of the water and plane swiftly across the top. It’s best to have a few lessons on the o-belt before braving a windy day. You’ll be starting on a dug-up board which is a bit broader than a wave board. You won’t fall off as much starting out on one of these then you can progress to a wave board or a free style board and when you get ultra skillful a slam board for ultimate speed. You’ll spend a lot of time in the bent kneed squat as the wind picks up. As the wind slows, you’ll return to an upright position, the ultimate conditioning action of your quadriceps, gluts, and hamstrings. Windsurfers have well-developed upper back muscles too as a result of trying to keep the sail from being thrown forward in to the water. It’s a great all over work out. If you like your exercise exciting this is the sport for you. One bushel of modern wheat provides about 20 kilograms of wheat flour. Spelt is 30% less productive.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement