Learn about Vibration Exercise and Dolphin Therapy Video

Explore the health and wellbeing issues concerning vibration exercise and dolphin therapy.
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Learn about Vibration Exercise and Dolphin Therapy Female: So libs and professional athletes are getting in to the good vibrations. Vibration exercise machines such as the power plate and the solar flex promise the world, but do they really deliver? Can increase G force, have a positive impact on your health? Some exercise experts believe so. Mark Andrews: Well in sense, it’s a big vibrating platform. It vibrates at different frequencies between 30 to 50 times a second. So it's an accelerated platform moves basically -- it’s moving its gravity underneath the person that’s using the machine. Female: The platform is big enough to complete a workout on, from warm up to the strength training. Push ups can be done on it, squats, anything you can manage to do while having contact with the vibrations. The vibe has supposed to increase blood circulation, raise your metabolism and rid the body of waste more efficiently. Lana Hornigolld: We start off with the warm up just to get the blood flowing in the body then we start right on the legs then we move up the body so we do stomach, your back, your arms and then we finish with stretching and massage. Female: Vibrating exercises will apparently increase flexibility, improve balance and heal and build muscles. Not to mention, burn copious amounts of fat. Lana Hornigolld: It covered from the strength thing and the toning that we mentioned to the flexibility but there are things like, the cellulites side of it. It’s amazing. It really helps with the lymphatic drainage. It strengthens your collagen tissue, so cellulite reduction is quite massive. Also bone density is a big one which is why it was really used in the first place, why the technology was around. So you use it for osteoporosis to help build up the bone density. Female: Some experts are concerned that exceeding the half hour per day recommended exposure to high intensity vibration may increase the risk of the injury to the lower back and disrupt internal organ function. These are concerns people operating large vibrating machinery phase and they are recommended daily limits to such vocational activities for a reason. If you are hot patient or suffering a neurological disorder, seek medical advice before using vibration devices, and avoid them altogether if pregnant. If you are unsure where you stand, perhaps it safest to stick with exercise, the good old fashion way. These magical creatures of the sea hold a special talent. They are great healers with a gift to make mute children speak, bring people out of commas and inspire disabled children to take their first steps. Sounds like an exotic myth, doesn’t it? But each case can be verified and there is a large body of anecdotal evidence to back up the claim that dolphins can do things psychologist and doctors can’t. Anthropologist Dr. Betsy Smith first discovered the dolphin’s ability to heal when she noticed improvements in her disabled brother’s behavior after he’d spent some time with them. Another doctor clued in to the concept and opened the dolphin human therapy center in Florida. He works specifically with children with Down Syndrome and the results was so inspiring, Dolphin Therapy Center started cropping up all over the world. Dolphins have a fascination with pregnant women. So if you see a sign saying, “No pregnant women allowed to swim with the dolphins” it’s not because of any potential danger, it’s because the dolphins will probably ignore all the other visitors to queue over the unborn child. Russian doctors took this fascination one step further and started the Black Sea Birthing Project where pregnant women had underwater births among pods of dolphins in the Black Sea. The children born this way develop faster in terms of walking and talking and are ambidextrous. Studies are continuing to the dolphins effects on human child birth. But despite the past 30 years of dolphin research into dolphin assistant therapist, Emory University believes entering the water with

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