Learn About the Space Mission for Haley's Comet Video

Learn about the space probe to fly near Haley's comet and to collect sample dust of the comet for further research.
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Learn About the Space Mission for Haley's Comet If we were to travel away from the sun leaving the planets behind to lay fate into the blackness of space and until the sun itself is destined on the bright spot in the sky, we would see a thin cloud of objects enveloping the entire solar system. These are the primordial comets billions of ice and glows no more than 30 miles across. They have been here unchanged since the beginning of the solar system. Haley’s comet began its first journey around the sun thousands of years ago. When it came close to earth in 1986, NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory was studying a mission to intercept it with a spacecraft. It was an opportunity too good to be missed to investigate the best known comet of all at close range. The proposed craft would use hardware and technology from the successful Voyager mission to Jupiter and Saturn and from within developing Galileo mission to orbit Jupiter. It was to be equipped to examine the comets in detail and would carry a new electronic camera to produce highly detailed pictures. Other instruments, many from Voyager were added to rebuild the comet’s chemistry, recorded ultraviolet an infrared radiation measure its magnetic field and collect samples of its dust. This unique mission was to begin in the summer of ’85 and NASA’s used space shuttle would be used to launch the curb on its 8-month journey to Haley. Similar missions were also planned by European, Japanese, and Soviet space teams. Guiding the spacecraft to a successful encounter required the pinpoint techniques learned over 20 years of space exploration. Intercept quarter curve after Haley pass the sun. A full two months before the encounter, cameras aboard the spacecraft would begin taking pictures returning thousands of photos to earth. Crowding within 500 miles of beneath the west, the robot was to give us our first look at the heart of Haley’s great comet and a glimpse back to the stars of the solar system. However, as history dictates, interception was aborted.

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