Learn About the Simulation of Space Flights Video

Learn about the motion based cruise station of NASA, in which simulations are done for space flights. Also learn about the Phase II mission, in which the use of water and air was the subject of research.
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Learn About the Simulation of Space Flights This astronaut is landing is landing the space shuttle for the fifth time today. It’s the shuttle mission simulators motion based crew station. Once assigned to flight, a crew will log as many as 300 hours in this high-tech trainer before lift off. And as launch day nears, the training grows even more realistic at the S.M.S. The shuttle mission simulator is linked by computer to mission control allowing flight controllers to interact with the crew using actual mission software. But the most realistic aspect of the S.M.S. is its ability to simulate the physical experiences at the different phases of a mission such as the turbulence of launch and accent. The S.M.S. will continue to help NASA train their pilots for space flights now and in the future. This is the life support system facility. A high altitude chamber converted into a living space for NASA’s phase two mission. It has three separate stories comprising at 1,000 square feet of living area. The principal objective of this ground base mission was to recycle all the air and water inside the chamber for 30 days beginning with enough air and water to only one week. Preparing for the test was an exciting time for the four person crew. They went through extensive training not only on the systems but also one thing like microbiological samplings. As members of backup crew lit dawn, the samplings became even stranger. And while there were many enjoyable aspects to the month long mission. No swabs but definitely not one of them. As part of the traditional ceremony on entry day, the crew cut a cake on behalf of all mission personnel. At door closure, all the team manages run hand to make sure the chamber was sealed up tight. The crew was then used to see so many NASA executives on hand to make sure that they weren’t going anywhere. Round the clock monitoring and operation support throughout the mission was provided by an exceptional testing located in a 20 foot control chamber close to the life support system facility. The crews water use was heavily regulated approximately .1 to 2 gallons was dedicated for hand washers. The phase duty with Cathy Halberd, John Lewis, Doug Mean and Pretoria spent a lot of time together in the common area on the first level. It’s where they have meals, conducted press conferences, held group meetings and enjoyed their limited leisure time. This was the third level restroom and to call it basic would be an understatement. Similar to today’s space station bathrooms, which have in fact helped to design, it uses a simple waste removal system and funnel. Hand washing had to be done quickly before the predetermined quantity of water would run out. The entire aim behind the mission was to see how long air and water could be recycled and maintained, so every drop was vital. And, once the water was used, it needed to be logged in order to help scientist on the outside determine how efficient the life support systems were functioning inside the chamber. The food level contain the crews quarters. It was their home away from home where they slept, read, worked, and on occasions hid. With the use of the internet and telephones, they were still able to communicate with the outside world.

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