Learn about the Shuttle Pallet Satellite, also known as the SPAS, which is a reusable space platform.
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Learn About the Shuttle Pallet Satellite A European pay load called SPAS or shuttle pallet satellite provided this magnificent views. It’s a unique reusable space platform built by West German aerospace company. In addition to having film and TV cameras mounted on SPAS, ten experiments belonging to the West German government, the European space agency and NASA we’re on the platform. The test for SPAS was to prove that satellite design validity and that experiment could be operated successfully while SPAS was free flying. NASA wanted to show that the remote manipulator system could handle the two and half ton pay load. The orbiters ability to station keep with SPAS was also demonstrated. At this point there are 1,000 featured parts. Here SPAS and the shuttle are 200 feet apart; thrusters on board the shuttle were fired to record the effect on SPAS. Finally, SPAS is rebirth for return to earth. The shuttle crew also deployed two communication satellites, a Canadian satellite for pay TV operations and an Indonesian satellite to help with telecommunication services to the islands many remote locations. Shuttle flight seven was to be the first shuttle flight to touch down in the Kennedy Space Center but bad weather conditions did not allow it. Challenger landed instead at Edwards’s air force base in California. The pre-designated alternate landing site, during the period of communications black out usually lasting about 15 minutes temperatures on the vehicle surface reached their peak. The temperature of the red hot blows seen through Challengers front window was about 2400°F. One astronaut described the view as being inside a furnace.

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