Learn About the Importance of Studying Planet Mars Video

Learn about the discoveries and information on the planet Mars and its surface.
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Learn About the Importance of Studying Planet Mars 4.5 billion years ago, the planets were solidified and undergoing a period of intense bombardment. The surface of Mars was no exception. 4 billion years ago, the surface was fractured and the planet was probably warmer at winter. As time evolved, water filled these cracks, and the solutions may have result in the globule seeing the meteorite you’re about to see. As the carbonate globules were growing, it was probably a presence of a microbiota. As the carbon that's grooved from the solutions and filled the fractures and voids, they began to entrain these organisms. We know this from the isotropic chemistry of the materials. Then, Mars went through a period of becoming colder and drier. We know that during the period from 3.6 billion years ago up-to 16 million years ago, a very large object struck the surface of Mars and knocked material from the surface, which then traveled through space for up-to 16 million years until it was attracted by earth’s gravity. And about 13,000 years ago, fell onto the Antarctic ice sheet where it resided until discovered in 1996. A joint science foundation for the collection of meteorites supported by NASA and the Smithsonian Institute brought the sample back to the Johnson Space Center, where it was cleaned and processed. A closer look underneath the bladed surface, created as it came through the Earths atmosphere notes the areas of weathering and alteration. As we look closer at the spot magnified many times, thanks to Monica Grady from the British Museum, we can detect the carbonate globules with their black and white rims. These are 250 microns or approximately five times the diameter of a human hair, and point to the fact that billions of years ago, life in some form did exists on Mars. The equipment used to ascertain the information on the meteorite is so sensitive that it’s able only to view a thousand molecules at a time. An infrared laser hits the sample causing it to heat up and evaporate. This produces a plume of gas cloud. Then the ultra violet laser excites some of the molecules but can absorb it but using ions which are picked up by the detector. The process is repeated to reduce a map of the sample. By detecting the arrival time of the ions, the weight of the molecules is measured convincing scientists of the first organic molecules form Mars.

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