Learn about the Russia space program, such as the Sputniks. In this video you will also learn about the fate of the space laboratory MIR.
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Learn About the History of the Russian Space Program Russia’s space program began with the launch of the first satellite Sputnik on October 4th 1957 to mark the 48th anniversary of the October Socialist Revolution. The next step was the first man flied on April 12th 1961, when Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin blasted into orbit and flew around the earth. The construction of the Mir space station was another scientific and technological achievement. The first module of the space station was launched into orbit on February 20, 1986. Less than a month later, the first crew landed Kissin and Vladimir Solovioff were making themselves at home. The designers of the space station have intended their creation to last from three to five years, but its life happened to last almost four times longer. Mir is made of 85,850 spins around earth in the 15 years of its existence. Several international crews had— During its one and half decades, many lifestyle and scientific experiments were conducted. Much information and knowledge has been garnered from the experiments and research conducted on the Mir spacecraft. The experiments took all forms, all shapes, and sizes. Here, an open solar antenna floats free creating a magical scene with our beautiful planet below. In February 24, 1997, Mir had its first serious accident. A fire broke out when cosmonauts try to change an air filter forcing the international crew to wear gas masks. Several months later, a progress cargo ship hit Mir puncturing one of its modules and damaging solar batteries. In September 1997, a computer failure sent Mir spinning out of orientation from the sun and it was a nervous 24 hours before mission control regained control. Hope for the Mir space station came from the US. Some investors pledged to pay 20 million US dollars to continue the Mir program. A month later, a cargo spacecraft delivered fuel and supplies to restart the space laboratory. Later, two men crew returned to the space station to adopt it for tasks deranging from industrial production and scientific experiments to space tourists and advertising in orbit. With all efforts to prolong Mir’s life came to nothing. Equipment failures continued and promised private investment fail to materialize. Despite protests, the sinking of Mir, once the symbol of Russia’s space glory was inevitable. It schedules plash into the pacific in March or April 2001 was given to go ahead.

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