Learn about the Galileo 2 and its discoveries and samples for further research.
Read the full transcript »

Learn About the Galileo 2 From a distance, it looks like any other plane coming in for a landing. The similarity is in there however. Inside, this jet is filled with highly sophisticated Science experiments, a laboratory with wings called Galileo II, the Airborne Science Laboratory through its missions from NASA's Ames Research Center in California. It’s seen here landing in Melbourne, Australia. One stop in a globe spanning experiment from pole to pole to see if there were changes in our upper atmosphere caused by gases used in aerosol cans and other pollutants. There were eight different experiments either in or on the plane. Some collected samples from Probes mounted outside the aircraft and that the onboard computer many were analyzed on the spot. Others were brought—turn to the laboratory for additional analysis. Scientists were collecting information on everything they could detect in our atmosphere. From the earth up, aerosols jet flame exhausts anything that might have adversely affect our planet. From space, they measured cosmic rays and charged particles, even measurements in water vapor wee proving to be helpful and were instrumental in further studies of air turbulence. All the dates have taken, we studied in greater detail by universities and research centers around the globe. Surveying atmospheric pollution from an airborne laboratory, a cooperative effort to study the effects of pollution on the overall atmosphere and on life here.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement