Learn about the discoveries of the Galileo Mission of the planet Jupiter and its environment.
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Learn About the Discoveries of the Galileo Mission Using some spectacular footage from the voyager craft one and two, we take a fresh look at the planet Jupiter. The voyager’s closeness to the planet enabled scientists to gain a far better view of this planet, and was available from earth based telescopes. As voyager passed Jupiter, it discover the thin ring around the planet. What is its composition? We know there are 16 moons, are there more? Several of the satellites are composed partially of water ice. One is violently volcanic. How deep these bodies form and what did is their history? What can this giant planet tell us about the history of our solar system? Galileo was designed to spend an extended period of time in the Jovian System. The spacecraft would release a probe to fly it’s own trajectory to Jupiter. The obiter was then targeted to its first encounter, IO, a moon known to have very active volcanoes. Then, the obiter pointed its relay antenna to with the probe, which begins its decent into Jupiter’s atmosphere. Once there, it investigated the composition, temperatures, and pressures of varying levels. And sent data back to the orbiter was then retransmitted the information back to earth. The orbiter looped to through the Jovian System, measuring and observing the giant magnetic field and plasma, as well as the intense radiation that surrounds Jupiter, while performing closer studies of the moons. The combination of closer encounters and advanced instrument technologies gave Galileo much better definition of surfaces than ever before. Based on analysis of the voyager data, the Galileo spacecraft was much improved for the task of examining Jupiter. In particular, Galileo had an entirely new device for mapping in infrared. It is called a Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer, which is rather like a land set device giving us images of many different spectral bands. The scientist on a Galileo projects used these images to map composition on the surfaces of Jupiter and to satellites, including the characteristics of Jovian clouds, and to find out were there is ice and other geographic features on the planes surface. On root of Jupiter, Galileo picked up energy by utilizing gravity assists while traveling once by Venus and twice by Earth. In addition to the bonus of studying these two planets and earth’s moon, Galileo did fly by’s of one or two asteroids, never before closely observed. Then Galileo rendezvoused with Jupiter and its moons. This unique trajectory allowed Galileo to reach its ultimate goal, returning a bonanza of scientific information and knowledge from the Jupiter system.

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