Learn about the Apollo 14 moon landing. Also learn what the mission of Apollo 14 was about.
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January 31st 1971, Alan B. Shepard makes his second space flight, this time as Commander of Apollo 14, the country’s third moon landing. With astronauts Mitchell and Roosa accompanying Shepard, Apollo 14 marked the beginning of large scale use of the moon for science. These are some of the 94 pounds of lunar rocks that were returned from the moon’s ancient hills by Apollo 14. They were just beginning to tell scientists their story, a story three and half billion years old. From them, we learned to about the early history not only of the moon but of other planets as well; the Earth, Mars, even Venus and Mercury. This was the view seen by Apollo 15 astronauts Scott and Irwin as their spacecraft Falcon, descended towards the foot hills of the moon’s Albanian mountains. This was the most expensive exploration of the moon ever made. To prepare for the mission, Scott and Irwin practiced on similar earth terrain at the Rio Grande Gorge in New Mexico. They also spent many hours getting used to the lunar rover. Here’s what is actually looked like to the moon riders as they drove their four-wheel buggy over 16-miles of lunar surface. As a result of their increased mobility, the pair returned 180 lbs. of lunar rocks and deep-core samples. After lift off and while still in lunar orbit, the trio launched a small scientific satellite called the sub satellite to study the area around the moon. As they here in earth would, astronaut Alan Walden climbed outside the spacecraft and retrieved film from pair of mapping cameras. The scientific instruments left by Apollo 15 and the samples they returned gave us a real understanding of the moon and its relationship to both the Earth and the Sun.

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