Learn about Synchrotrons and Computer Assisted Surgery Video

Explore the health and wellbeing issues concerning synchrotrons and computer assisted surgery.
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Learn about Synchrotrons and Computer Assisted Surgery Host: Melinda Burchard remembers a time when she was full of energy and motivation, her time when her career as an international businesswoman was burgeoning. But ten years ago, Melinda fell victim to multiple sclerosis, a devastating autoimmune disease where in the body attacks its own nerve endings in the brain and spinal column. Until now scientist have remained in the dark regarding the cause of MS and other diseases but there is light ahead. Male: We’re trying to shed new light on the diseased multiple sclerosis, specifically what we’re doing is we’re using the incredibly bright source of light provided by the Australian Synchrotrons to probe the chemistry of the disease by the very tiny scopes. The difference between this type of technology and conventional technologies is that we’re probing the chemistry of the research. Host: The intense light from the Synchrotrons will allow scientists to see sills and tissues including tumors in great detail. Especially marked sills will be able to be followed as they interact with tissues and organs in real time. Experts will also be able to view how healthy and cancerous cells interact with radiation. Welcome to the future of medical imaging. Male: Synchrotrons have allowed us to do things we’ve never been able to do before. You can take an experiment that is possible in a lab and actually make it happen in the Synchrotrons thousand of times faster and thousand of times better. What it does is that it takes existing know how, existing ability and existing technology and super charges it. Host: The light from the Synchrotrons is divided into beam lines; each beam lines have unique capabilities. The applications are endless, from advances to radiotherapy to clinical practice and drug evaluation. The manufacturing industry even uses beam lines to better view the nature of engineering and construction with certain materials as the Synchrotrons lights the way to a brighter future. Imagine a world where surgery is less painful, less time consuming and more accurate, the future of surgery is already here as computer assisted surgery helps medical teams achieve all that and more. Computer assisted surgery or CAS can help doctors create a virtual model of the operable area, complete with arteries, soft and hard tissue definition and bony land marks. With these 3D models of your internal environment, they can plan the maneuvers of an operation ahead of time, saving a lot of time guess work and backtracking on the day. Male: We did for the first time in the world a navigation assisted hip replacement through incision with a technique called minimal invasive surgery using two incisions. When you do minimal invasive surgery, you don’t open the skin a lot and you do not make a large incision but you need some guidance system for implant alignment. We did replace the implant using a navigation system based on infrared light which enables us to put the implant exactly in the desired position. Host: Computer assisted surgery is being used extensively in inner ear and neurosurgery in tandem with robotics. Any where the surgeon needs an extremely steady hand and has limited access. Robots exist with pre programmed instructions for the operative procedure and are ten times more steady than the most competent surgeons hands. They can operate on their own or as extension of the surgeons own actions which are telecommunicated as the surgery takes place but more on that later. A computer program has just been developed which eliminates the risk of robotic arm collisions and tangles in surgery by predicting them first and blocking the unwanted action.

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