Explore the health and wellbeing issues concerning sunburn and sunglasses.
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Learn about Sunburn and Sunglasses Host: Summer time is the season when most people get out in about. Vacations, day trips to the beach, everyone likes to have a bit of fun in the sun. Unfortunately, too much fun can lead to nasty, red, itching sunburn. UV light and human skin just don’t mix. Those invisible rays can take just 10 to 15 minutes to give you a nasty scald. The BFX might be with you for a week or lifetime. Repeat bouts of sunburn over lifetime can damage cellular DNA leading to skin cancer down the track where the basal cell carcinoma or the deadly melanoma. Skin cancer is best avoided by covering up with thick cloth, 30plus sunscreen and a broad brimmed hat. Avoid the beach in the middle of the day. UV rays can even penetrate clouds so beware even if it’s overcast. In fact, UV labels aren’t linked to temperature at all so be sure to check the UV index for the day before stepping out for prolonged periods. If the index is three or above, it’s time for protection. Sunburn can occur in all skin types not just those of us unlucky enough to be lily white. And there is really very little that can be done once it’s happened. You can try the folk remedies like aloe vera or natural yogurt to take away the itch and sting but really, it’s a matter of time. Of course if there is extensive blistering, headache, fever and vomiting, you must see medical attention. Sunburn may well have turned into some stroke cases can be lethal. It’s no longer just enough to pile on the sunscreen. A long sleeve, UV resistant shirt is essential for sun protection. Roy Sanders: I found that the sun creams are not as effective as we had hoped in preventing Ultraviolet A getting through into the skin and damaging in such a way as we suspect to cause this nasty skin cancer melanoma. Host: Thankfully, due to advertising and awareness campaigns, melanoma rates are dropping that there’s still a long way to go. So, play it safe in the sun this summer time. Sunglasses are a fun, cool accessory but not only that they protect you against being a fashion failure, they also protect your sensitive eyes from the ravages over the sun. Your shades shade your eyes from damaging UV A and UV B light, minimizing the risk of cancers such as retinoblastoma and melanoma. Yes, melanoma can make its debut in your eyeball. Yet surprisingly, of the 74% of young people who owns sunglasses, only half of them actually wear their shades often enough to protect themselves from eye disease. For this reason, ophthalmologists are pushing to have good quality sunglasses amend it to be part of school uniform. 10% of skin cancers occur around the eye area so grab yourself a pair of good quality UV resistant sunglasses. It could be a life saver. Make an informed purchase. If the sunglasses you're holding don’t have any information about the level of UV protection may offer, it’s probably because they don’t offer any. Just because glass is tinted, it doesn’t mean it blocks out those nasty rays. Polarized and—lenses marketed as effective glare blockers may not necessarily block out UV’s. Make sure the glasses you buy block out at least 99% UV B rays and 95% UV A rays. This, according to the Mayo Clinic will give your eyes a fighting chance against the summer sun. Better to be a fashion victim than a victim of eye disease. Not all fabrics of the UV protection so apply sunscreen onto you cloths too just to be on the safe side.

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