Learn about Senior Chemistry, Energetics 2, in this comprehensive video by bannanaiscool.
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Rob Lederer: Yes, I know it's a very cloudy day and you can hardly see it but that of course the sun that is a very large bomb of nuclear energy as with the sun is all about I will show you the equation is a second is Hydrogen isotopes framing together to form helium that's one of the reactions there what's it producing all kinds of Electrode Magnetic Radiation is making gamma rays and x-rays and those who are being actually balanced right half of the atmosphere of the earth they harm us that's a good thing UV rays we got an ozone layer that protects us from the penetrating effects of those UV rays but how about all those other rays. Oh! My goodness there is light there is heat there is microwaves there is TV rays that's television rays and radio waves those are all coming from the sun and hit the earth. So we look at all this dead stuff we say what good is this dead stuff is dead stuff .Well, its organic matter dies breaks down into the ground and over time over a lot of time its believed that this will compress and turn into natural gas, oil, coal those things that we require right now as non-renewable resource is to power our plants, so of all the light rays that actually hit the earth now you just imagine how much light that the sun is putting power and how much its going into the rest of the universe how much do the earth absorb not very much. So of all of the light that hits the earth 0.023 percent of it gets tracked by these guys right here. Plants its photosynthesis plants will take that light combined with carbon dioxide and water they are going to turn that into glucose for themselves that eventually starch and oxygen for us to breathe. What you are looking at is a flare stack from the natural gas facility here in Alberta in a radius for about 100 kilometers around this plant there are natural gas wells that are pumping. Methane gas, Ethane gases all mixed together and shipping it through pipes right to this facility over here for the exclusive purpose of removing Hydrogen sulphide gas that's H2S gas that's with these plants are for the H2S gas gets processed then turn into elemental sulphur and they heat it up it liquefy it molten sulphur they store it in storage tins underneath the facility and then trucks come by they load up the trucks with molten sulphur carrying off to real way yards and ship to the west coast to be able to be used fro fertilizer and to make sulphuric acid. And then the processed gas is the methane and the ethane they leave that plant on the other side and they take off to other places in Alberta and even all the way down to California, what do we use the gas for once we shift it out it out to the pant well in Alberta we can use to here our homes to cook out food in California we mainly use it produce electricity so what happens is then that the natural gas get shipped into a plant it burns boils water the water is driven through pipes the pipes get narrow and narrower great pressure is exerted on to big fan blades that turn that's the turbine hooked up to the generator to make electricity the electricity then travels through the wires gets to your house. And then of curse the electricity finally gets to your house and you can utilize it as light as heat and curl you hair with it in the curling iron you can use your electric shaver and my favorite appliance of course the vacuum cleaner now the thing is with fast fuel combustion in order to provide electricity its a very inefficient process the vast majority of the heat that's generated to boil the water to drive the turbines to make the generator or may be this rod is completely lost as heat that comes of these reactions very inefficient it does the way we do it in the province of Alberta. Most of the electricity that we actually make the power comes from the combustion of coal that we dig from the ground about 4-6% of the land mass of our province is made up of coals so basically if you can find coal here you find some here if you dig down

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