Learn about Scientific Revolutions Video

Learn about Scientific Revolutions in this educational video from dizzo95.
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Question: What makes a revolution? Male Speaker: Freud once said that the common feature of all great scientific revolutions is that they invariably knock human arrogance of one pedestal after another of our previous convictions about our own self importance. That's what Freud said the first great revolution was -- Galileo because he taught us that we didn't live on the central body of a small Universe, but we are off on some peripheral. Then Freud said, the second great revolution was Darwin's because he relegated us to decent from an animal world. Science Affects Society Male Speaker: Science affects society in many ways, so its direct way of course is technology. I think Marx for all things he was wrong was absolutely right in saying that the means of production pretty much determine the nature of social relations ultimately in means of production chains through altering technology. Is evolution progress Male Speaker: Evolution is not about progress in Darwin's sense. In Darwin's sense under the theory of natural selection, evolution is adaptation to change in local circumstances, that's all it is and that doesn't include a principle of progress. For example, suppose a herd of elephants are rushing, and it's getting cold because it's going to be an ice age, then there is natural variation among those elephants in how much hair they have. The ones that are hairier on average not every single time leave more amount of spring because they do better as the cold advances and a 100 generations down the line, you get wooly mammoth because they -- I suppose that happened, the only mammoth is on cosmically a better element, it's just an elephant better adapted to the local circumstances of cold in Russia. Society Affects Science Male Speaker: It is not possible to offer like an objective fact gathering robot. If we think we can, then we are just eluting ourselves, there is going to be more subject to the prejudices we don't even know we have because we are not scrutinizing them. But sometimes a social prejudice is very useful. My favorite example is that when Darwin coined the theory of natural selection, he was very much influenced by Adam Smith's theory of economic development, which he knew about through social contacts. Darwin's theory natural selection is very much like Adam Smith's Laissez-Faire principle, that is if you want to have an ordered economy, Adam Smith tells us, let individual struggle for personal problems.

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