Learn about Rowing and Radiotherapy Video

Explore the health and wellbeing issues concerning rowing and radiotherapy.
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Learn about Rowing and Radiotherapy Rowing has been around since time immemorial and it’s still a fantastic way to keep fit and burn calories today as it was 11,000 years ago when Inuit people were racing each other in a hunt for seals. You will spend about 600 calories in a good hour of moderate rowing and the benefits to the cardiovascular system and upper body go without saying but it doesn’t end there. Exercise physiologist break down their rowing action into three phases. The first phase is called the catch, this is when the arms is stretched down to the front and the knees are close to the body ready for the next scope. Many of your muscled groups up the back, neck, shoulders and arms are engaged as a major muscle groups running down the backs of the legs. All of these groups pump up the action during the next phase called the drive. This is when they’re rower is pulling the oars through the water. More muscles including the gluteus maximus and the quadriceps jump on board to help. As the knees straighten up and the oars come towards the front of the rower the shoulders relax and the muscles in your longer arms become engaged. As you can see rowing gives you a total or over body workout. During the finishing phase as the rower leans back into the oars out of the water in front all muscle groups on the back of the body from the neck to the toes become engaged, not to mention the abs and quads. It’s tiring just thinking about it. If you wrote for just half an hour everyday you’d soon reap the rewards. Always combine your rowing training with other forms of strength training to minimize the risk of injury. Work on core strength to keep away those lower back injuries and herniated discs. Get a friend to keep an eye on your rolling technique from time to time to make sure your posture is correct. Poor technique is unfortunately common among rowers even if the professional level cracked ribs can occur due to poor technique and over training. Always have a good warm up session and stretch well before hopping in the show. Rotated cuff injuries are common so stretch deeply into the shoulder and upper arm area. But once you get your technique honed you’ll be in awe of how fit you become and how fast. Radiotherapy employs radiation to kill or injure cancer cells in the hope that they won’t keep growing. It’s often used in conjunction without a medicine such as surgery or chemotherapy in the battle against cancer. The unfortunate thing with radiotherapy is that it affects every cell in a targeted area whether it’s abnormal or not. Healthy cells though have a greater chance of recovery from radiation poisoning. Radiotherapy can be administered externally or internally. External radiotherapy only takes between two to five minutes per session and it’s painless. Although fatigue, skin rashes, hair loss and the changes is in bone marrow can be side effects. The real downside is that radiotherapy even though it might be successful in killing off a particular cancer this time around can actually cause secondary cancer some years down the track but this is not always the case and concerns should be discussed with your practitioner. Radiotherapy an also be administered internally. It can be implanted in a solid form close to the tumor or taken as a drink or even injected. Of course a hospital say is mandatory for this. Only some cancers are radiosensitive. Leukemia and lymphomas respond well to treatments but melanoma and renal cell cancers are radio resistant. Your practitioner will decide if radio therapy is right for you and which kind of radiation is required. If you’re a smoker, radiotherapy will have a better chance of working if you quit.

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