Learn about Prominent Ear Correction: Recovery and Possible Complications.
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Hello! My name is Adrian Richards. Thank you very much for taking the time today to watch this video, which I am going to be talking about the recovery period following prominent ear correction and the bandages used. So as I mentioned in the previous video about prominent ear correction, the operation will either be performed under local anaesthetic, twilight anaesthetic which is local anaesthetic when you are a bit sleepy as well, or full general anaesthetic and that's really your preference. So following the operation, the surgeon will close the skin behind the ear with a stitch, and I tend to use an absorbable stitch which doesn't need to be removed, other surgeons may use stitches which need to be removed, but you need to discuss whether they need to be removed or not with your surgeon. The dressings are quite important from the following prominent ear correction and these are really used to hold the ear and just stabilize it while you sleep in the first few days following surgery. Now with the anterior scoring methods that we used to use, the anterior scoring method is best known as the Chong-Chet procedure. So that's an older technique which some surgeons use. If they're using that technique, it's very important to keep pressure on the ear to prevent any blood collecting in the front of the ear. So in the older techniques, the dressings need to be on for longer and they need to be tighter and are more crucial to the outcome. With the more modern posterior approaches the dressings aren't quite as crucial as they were. So if you are having an anterior scoring technique, most surgeons would like the dressings on for a minimum of five days and probably seven days and these dressings can either be a bulky crepe bandage around your head, or some surgeons will prefer a sort of velcro type cap to wear. So all surgeons vary. It's not unusual for some people to like you to keep your dressings on for a week. I tend to use the posterior technique as I previously discussed because I think it's safer and I'm not so insistent on how long the dressings stay intact because the dressings aren't quite as crucial in this posterior technique. So I would sew the skin up at the back with an absorbable stitch and actually fairly enough glue the ear back using a tissue glue we use for cuts, glue the ear back just to the scalp like that so it's sort of held there, and that prevents the ear being sort of moved or dislodged in the early post-operative period and that glue basically separates after about a week and the ear will then ping forward. I do like to use light dressings, but as I say they are not so crucial for the outcome of the operation so I like to use light dressings and I normally like to keep them on two to three days just to sort of give a bit of stability to the ear in that initial period. Following when the dressings are removed, most surgeons would like you to wear some sort of head bandage, either a crepe of just you know just like a John McEnroe type tennis sweat band around the ears, just at night, just to protect the ears. So if you turn at night, so it's just to prevent you from sort of flicking the ears at night, but as I say, no dressings in the day after two or three days. So what complications can you get following operation? Well we've got to remember it is an anaesthetic, if you decided on the general anaesthetic route there are potential problems with general anaesthetics, but modern anaesthetics if you are fit and healthy they are very, very safe. Local anaesthetics are probably safer, but obviously you've got to be prepared to lie for an hour white someone is operating on your ear and actually the noise from an ear can be quite disturbing for some people because it is sort of magnified. So complications? Well bleeding is always a risk and that's particularly important with the anterior scoring method, because if you get any blood collecting between the skin and the gristly cartilage of the ear in the front, t

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