Learn about Organic Chemistry 1, in this comprehensive video by bannanaiscool.
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Rob Lederer: It's time for organic chemistry. Now organic chemistry is just carbon chemistry where carbon is the principle atom. The molecules that are involved in organic chemistry are from a biological nature that's living right now kind of molecules or once living, carbon chemistry. Now, not all carbon types of molecules or molecules that have carbon in it are organic like carbonates, like sodium carbonate Na2Co3. No. That's not organic. Carbonates aren't organic; you on the -- might find that a polyatomic ion called cyanide CN- that's not organic either. A lot of oxides of carbon aren't organic too. It's basically hydrocarbon chemistry, so its carbon atoms with hydrogens bonded to it and sometimes some oxygens and nitrogens too. Now, what we are going to concentrate on is what normally happens in high school and first -- university type organic chemistry, which is just to get the nomenclature of how to name these molecules down plus some very important reactions. Now, before we get into that nomenclature kind of thing, here are some ways that formulas are going to be shown in the organic chemistry unit. Here is the formula for organic molecule, C2H6 it's called Ethane. I'm going to tell you about that little bit later. Here is ethane and that's its formula. So, we are all very familiar with that. Now, the structural formula how its shaped, but only in two dimensions on a flat piece of paper or a board like this, C2H6 could be drawn using this structural formula. Well, that could be, it is. Now that's the structural formula when you see it written down with the bonds in it that's a Lewis diagram though, isn't it? So that's a structural formula. But you can say that this is a C with three Hs and a C with three Hs and so CH3CH3, that's called a condensed structural formula. You could see any of those especially, in a text book so be aware when you see these types of formulas what they really mean and how they want to you build it? This is just a CH3 CH3. Now, look down here. Here is Propane. C3H8. Here is its structural formula, and then we have a condensed structural formula. Sometimes you see condensed structural formula with the lines actually in between the carbons as well, don't get freaked out, it's just a condensed structural formula with lines in it. Now, there is also something called a line diagram where some scientists who get kind of lazy, they just go and involve with the carbons anymore and by the way, you are going to see that what I'm going to do is I'm not going to bother writing in a lot of hydrogens anymore. When you write a structural formula and you put just lines off of carbon atoms, what you are doing is you are intimating that there are hydrogens half of that carbon. So, we have -- instead of drawing those Hs all over the place, we just draw the Cs, and then bunch of lines. It would look like that, right? A line diagram for ethane is real simple, but that's a line. Yeah, I know it's just a line and that line intimates of suggests that there are and there it has a point here which is a carbon and a point that has a carbon and so that line, which is a single bond in between the two carbons gives you ethane. So, then what would this one be here? It's propane. Well, it would be like that. One, two, three points. It's so when you got the three points, that's your C3 and that was H8 that's propane. Now, let's go on to the next one. Where are going to start talking about how to name these things like ethane and propane.

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