Explore the health and wellbeing issues concerning mobile phones and music therapy.
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Learn about Mobile Phones and Music Therapy Female: It's hard to believe that a mere decade ago, you weren’t considered eccentric if you didn’t have a mobile phone. Now most people scratch their heads in wonder on how to possibly live life without one. But have we become complacent about the health aspects of having radio waves positioned so closely to our brains? Studies have been done and none of them concur. It's hard to know what to believe. Do mobiles make men infertile? Do they double the risk of brain cancer? Do the microwaves damage your DNA? Many experts believe so. Alan Preece: Well, they simply make the exposure lower if there is any pressure from the public because it's perfectly possible in the design of the handset to make the exposure to the brain considerably lowered. Female: If you're worried about using your mobile phone, experts suggest keeping calls very brief to avoid possible radiation damage to the brain. Text wherever possible. Some scientists believe people under 20 should avoid putting the handset to their heads all together and should text instead over time. Children have thinner skulls, thus less protection against intrusive waves than fully grown adults. Alan Preece: We should have been doing research long before. Because of the kind of research it is, it's a big large scale cohort or case control studies, those do take a long time. There’s nothing much you can do about that. It is going to take a couple of years for those to emerge. Female: A recent large study by three world renowned universities has linked mobile phone usage while pregnant to behavioral disorders in children by the time they turn seven. Remember to walk away from vulnerable people like pregnant women and children while making calls or better still, let your fingers do the talking. Music is often described as food for the soul. But did you also know that it's used to heal the mind and body. Music therapy has been helping people since 1944. The underlying assumption is that everyone responds to music. It doesn’t matter how sick or incapacitated you are, music will move you. According to therapists, music has a profound effect on people suffering from all kinds of melodies. Bridgit Hogan: It's very individual response and its power varies from person to person. For some people physically, it's very powerful. It physically makes them feel less stressed, less anxious, less breathless. They experience less pain. For other people, it's emotionally extremely powerful. Female: Studies have recently been done on the effects of music therapy on those rehabilitating from stroke and heart disease. In combination with traditional physiotherapy, music therapy is proven to speed up and increase the chances of recovery from stroke. Certain types of music lower the heart rate and blood pressure, an invaluable tool for heart disease patients. Music affects the emotions and moods of the ill, making them feel more motivated towards healing themselves. We always thought the body played the music; it seems the music plays the body right back. In world wars I and II, live music was played in wards to motivate the recovery of injured soldiers.

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