Learn about Magnesium Health Benefits - Part 4 Video

Learn about Magnesium Health Benefits with Dr Dean - Jigsaw Health Webinar - Part 4 in this video from JigsawHealth.
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Dr. Carolyn Dean: The body eliminates it. Patrick Sullivan: Well, you are right on because you actually just answered Leo's question. He asked, if we increase magnesium and then how can we tell when we are getting too much? If I understand it correctly, when your balance are loose, that's when you are getting too much. Dr. Carolyn Dean: Correct. Patrick Sullivan: Well then let's move to the next question. This question comes from Dona. She says that she has a 24-year-old with incredible PMS and I would assume that means bad PMS, who is on the pill. She is wanting to know how long to get results, how long to see results with magnesium? Dr. Carolyn Dean: Some women will get results the first time they take it. If they can take magnesium for two weeks before the period then it can help release the spasming and cramping and their PMS but along with that goes the need for the B-complex vitamins and probably a decrease of animal proteins and dairy. That combination can really help release PMS significantly within the first three months. Patrick Sullivan: Our next question comes from Lloyd. He asks, what kind of magnesium that you recommend, I think you were referring to in an earlier slide? Dr. Carolyn Dean: Yes, you can go back to that slide. The dimagnesium malate is a good oral source. The magnesium citrate is an oral source. I think it has more of a laxative effect. Sometimes people will experiment with different kinds of magnesium to see which one suits them best, but it is their individual. I do get their feedback on the dimagnesium malate, where people have found other magnesiums too laxative for them. Patrick Sullivan: And obviously Jigsaw magnesium uses dimagnesium malate of the special form. I don't say that's a brag or anything, just that we really did our research and found that, that is what work best for a number of people who are using it. Dr. Carolyn Dean: And, I guess it's just low release factors, well that keeps it from being all absorbed at once. Then what happens for example, if you take three pills of magnesium all at once then you do overload your body and you will utilize some and the rest will go out through your intestines but I guess the slow release process will allow it to be slowly absorbs so that it does not cause the laxative effect. Patrick Sullivan: In general, if people want to run up to the store and want to look at magnesium, one of the things that I often tell customers is if you're trying to judge the magnesium, look at the suffix of the form that it end, so the suffix ending in ATE, so a citrate, a sulphate, a malate, those are generally more absorbed and better tolerated than a suffix ending in IDE, such as an oxide or a hydrochloride, is that correct? Dr. Carolyn Dean: Well, that makes sense because what I know of the magnesium oxide, it's very little absorbed and it's a great laxative. So for some people who are severally constipated, they can take magnesium oxide. But yes, that's a good way of putting it Patrick. Patrick Sullivan: Our next question is from Steven, he wants to know about magnesium in autism? Dr. Carolyn Dean: Yes, I do use magnesium with autistic children. It does help their irritability and their sleep, it helps detoxify having that a little bit. A lot autistic children are constipated so it helps with that as well. It's a very important nutrient for autistic children. Of course, there are a lot of other things going on. I find the most important thing with autism is avoiding the caffeine and milk protein and the gluten wheat proteins. Those two factors really irritate the brain and you can improve a child's behavior considerably by being on a caffeine-free gluten-free diet. Patrick Sullivan: Carol, she asks can a magnesium deficiency make adrenal fatigue worse? Dr. Carolyn Dean: Yes very much so because magnesium is very important to support the adrenal glands to produce adrenaline, to produce cortisols. So if the adrenal glands are constantly stressed, they don't have t

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