There's a new solution for the 14 million Americans who suffer from low vision.
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Casey Taylor: What books like a relaxing afternoon at home is actually a remarkable feat for Barbara Whitlock. Barbara Whitlock: It is almost mind-boggling really. I could, you know, actually say to read made me want to cry, to tell you the truth. Casey Taylor: For the past nine years a combination of cataracts and macular degeneration stole her sight. Barbara Whitlock: You don't realize what you've lost until you've lost it. Casey Taylor: Her passion, keeping up with the news was taken away until she put on a unique pair of glasses. Dr. Jeffrey Sonsino: This doesn't cure anything, but what this does is it allows people with the condition to function better. Casey Taylor: The condition that Barbara and 14 million other American suffer from is called low vision. It's what happens when macular degeneration, diabetes, or glaucoma damages the eyes and their vision can't fixed with regular glasses, contacts, or surgery. Dr. Jeffrey Sonsino: Is that a little bit sharper? Casey Taylor: Optometrist Jeffrey Sonsino created illuminated low vision glasses. They combined a high-power LED light in the frame, magnifying lenses, and prism correction that prevents eye fatigue Dr. Jeffrey Sonsino: Those three things together provide magnification and enhanced contrast when the patient is reading at a very close distance. Casey Taylor: In a study, the glasses improved patient's reading abilities by almost 90% compared to regular glasses. Dr. Jeffrey Sonsino: So with regular reading glasses she read around here and with the study glasses she got to this line. Casey Taylor: A simple solution that makes a world of difference for a woman who wants to see the details in her life. I'm Casey Taylor reporting.

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