Lakshmi Mehta, M.D Medical Genetics from Mount Sinai Medical Center talks about Klinefelter's Syndrome.
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Host: Some times the chromosomes and Xen to be extra more it seems. Discuss that a little bit about sex genes sometimes like too many things whether? Lakshmi Mehta: So, we actually have a group of chromosome aneuploidy called the sex chromosome aneuploidy, so that consists of really either and extra X chromosome, which could be regard and which case, its XXX or in a boy. Host: Which is called? Lakshmi Mehta: Which is called -- the old way people used to call in super females, I don’t think we would like to use that kind of terminology. The -- if it’s X chromosome in XXY, which is Klinefelter syndrome. Host: What those klinefelter’s look like --? Lakshmi Mehta: In our Klinefelter syndrome, actually in young children maybe completely in distinguishable, so you may never pickup the child klinefelter syndrome as in young child, but they do not develop normal testis, so what happens over time as the have a lack of testosterone, they tend to be a little low tone, they tend to be little weak, they tend be a little flexy. As they reach puberty, you see a delay in the all set of puberty, they tend to be taller than average. They can have sometimes some -- Host: Actually, are they normal? Lakshmi Mehta: They have IQs in the normal range, but they can’t have learning problems, we say generally that they are probably maybe 10, 20 points lower than that of disablings. So, there are some milder developmental issues with them. Host: But they can be missed sometimes. Lakshmi Mehta: They can be completely missed and they may just come to you as an infertile, male who is having problems in conceiving long afterwards when he trying to have a child.

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