Explore the health and wellbeing issues concerning kiwi fruit, kayaking and keyhole surgery.
Read the full transcript »

Known for thousand of years as the Sun Peach in China, the delectable berry contains 1.5 times the daily recommended intake on vitamin C. Packed with more potassium than a banana and more magnesium than most fruits, Kiwis are definitely one for the shopping list. Scientist have discovered a compound in Kiwis that discourages the mutation of cells stopping cancer dead in its tracks before it even begins. The Argenine in Kiwis is being looked at by cardiologists to prevent the formation of clog in the arteries. Full of dietary fiber, kiwis actually speed up the passage of food through the digestive tract giving cancer causing metabolites no chance to settle in. Now, here is a sport with real history. Thanks to the ingenuity of the Inuit people over thousands of years. Here is a craft that is sleek and design, lightweight, maneuverable and ready for adventure. Grab an oar and go kayaking. The modern kayak is far from being a wooden frame lashed with sinew and covered in seal’s skin. Today’s craft are fashioned from rotor molded plastics or lightweight aluminum. A traditional craft would have you riding cockpit style with a watertight spray skirt tucked around your waist, great for epic journeys. But for modern convenience, you cannot for an open design. Paddle your way through health and fitness. Arms are toned and core strength enhanced as you roll on down the river. Paddle upstream for an extra workout. Increase your lung capacity and feel your cardiovascular fitness increase day by day. Push yourself to the limit, just you, the open water and the great outdoors. It sure beats the rowing machine at the gym. You can kayak on a lake, in the surf or for the more adventurous amongst us, head to the wilderness for a white water experience. If you don’t want to go alone, kayak’s come with double and triple cockpits. Grab a kayak and a friend and hit the water. Not so long ago, any major abdominal surgery such as gall stone removal or an organ transplant meant open surgery with massive scarring and considerable recovery time. The advent of keyhole surgery has thankfully changed all that. The very first keyhole surgery performed on humans happened way back in 1910, but it wasn’t until the invention of minute computer chip television cameras and laparoscopic clips that the technique really took off in the 1990’s. The incisions made for keyhole are only between 5 millimeters and 1-centimeter long compared to a 20 centimeter plus cut that may be used in open surgery. Through these incisions, carbon dioxide is pumped to inflate the abdomen and create space for the surgeons to work and see. Keyhole surgery generally takes a few hours longer than open but for less chance for hemorrhaging, less pain and a shorter recovery time, it’s well worth it. Be brave and eat a kiwi with the skin on. This is where most of the antioxidants reside and will also triple your kiwi fiber intake.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement