Learn about Junior Chemistry, Solutions 2, in this comprehensive video by bannanaiscool.
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Rob Lederer: A factor that affects solubility is the temperature of the solvent that you're dissolving the solute into. a solute, generally is the solid portion of the mixture that you are putting in to the solvent to make a solution. Solute and solvent makes a solution. But, if you have two liquids that are mixing together, the one in lesser amount is the solute and the one in greater amount is the solvent, together again, they will make a solution. Now, in terms of factors that affects solubility, temperature can actually affect how much or the quantity that you can dissolve of a solute into a solvent. Now, here is a generalization. Doesn't work for all ionic compounds necessarily, but it is a good one. When you taking something like sodium chloride and you want to take a solid and put into water. It's just above the air. I am just telling you that I am dissolving it in water to form sodium chloride aqueous; you can dissolve more solid into that solvent to make a solution, if you add heat. And so, by warming up the mixture, you can actually put more of the solid into the solvent. Chemicals will dissolve in one and other if they are alike in terms of either possessing charge in them or not possessing charge. So, I'll show you what I mean right here. The nature of the solute and the solvent in terms of their polarity is actually important. Now look, we are not going to talk about real chemical polarity in a proper sense until the bonding unit which comes up later on this disk. You can flip to it right now and look at it or if your teacher hasn't taught you that bonding unit before the solutions unit, you are kind of, just understand this polarity explanation to this degree right now and then really get into it, when I talk about shapes and polarities of molecules later. Then you want to come back to hear and really ground yourself very well with this nature of solute and solvent discussion. Okay now why, is it actually not a linear molecule of H2O straight across, but it is bend and because of that, water, because of, lets say right now, highly unsymmetrical type of shape. It is not linear like you would expect. It is kind of bend and so because of that water is a polar molecule. it actually has partially negative region around the oxygen and partially positive around the hydrogen. Now, water and salt NaCl because, NaCl turns into when you dissolve that into water, Na positive aq and Cl negative aq ions and by the way again, that's why it conducts so well in solution. moleculars don't because, they don't make charges. but ionic compounds make charges in solutions. Acids and bases too make charges in solutions and that's why they are electrolytes. Now NaCl turns into positive and negative charge. water has partially positive and negative regions in it and because of that, these two actually form solutions very, very well. Now, Methane gas, when you bubble methane into water, can you actually make a solution out of it, like you could if you bubbled in hydra HCl gas into water. You will get hydrochloric acid and that's an electrolyte. But, when you take methane gas which is quite symmetrical in terms of its look, isn't it? Really, in two dimensions here. This is a non polar molecule because of its degree of symmetry. Now, that's CH4. When you dissolve it into water which is polar, doesn't like to dissolve in water. Actually so you try to dissolve it, it wont do the job. So what you get is something that will not form a solution and so right here, this, these two together won't make a solution, this will. So here is what you have got. any ionic compound dissolves in water. You got yourself a solution and it doesn't matter if it usually is a low solubility ionic compound, it will still disassociate or dissolve a little bit in solution enough to form a conducting solution and one that can actually be called a solution. Pressure doesn't really affects solids and liquids going into the solution. But, it does affect gases and here is

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