Explore the health and wellbeing issues concerning job burn out and the Japanese diet.
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Are you finding it hard to keep your mind on the job? Feeling physically exhausted, emotionally drained and cynical about your work environment. These are just some of the symptoms of job burnout, and no, it’s not all in your imagination. Job burnout is a very real psychological condition. People who work in fields helping other people and those performing repetitive jobs are more at risk of job burnout than most of us. The increasing demands on teachers, nurses, counselors and those in law enforcement makes the more susceptible. Lack of resources, time pressure increased workload, all of these can contribute to burnout. You may find yourself planning to leave the job taking multiple sick days and suffering from anxiety and depression. But job burnout doesn’t just affect your mind. Recent research has discovered a link between burnout and diabetes type 2. It seems that even the insulin in your body finds it hard to get out of bed when you are perpetually stressed and unhealthy. So what can you do? Well, if you’re not in a financial position to take a six-month sabbatical, you can ask the powers that be for a reduction in work hours and a change in project. If it’s really all that bad, what about a complete change of vocation. This is a massive step but one worth considering. If you need to stay put, try managing your own stress. Take some relaxation classes, eat well and get ample sleep and exercise. Try to stop any negative mind chatter in its tracks. Talk to someone about your work problems. Build a support network. There are lots of positive steps that you can take before you become just another job statistic on the burnout heap. The Japanese are one of the hardest working time pressured and stressed nations on the planet. They work hard and play hard, and smoke and drink whilst doing it. But unlike people from western cultures, they don’t overly suffer from a plague of modern disease like diabetes, coronary heart disease and cancer. Scientists are supporting it down to the Japanese diet. As Japan is surrounded by sea, it makes sense that the main stay of their cuisine is seafood and only the freshest will do. Sashimi or raw fish is a fine source of Omega 3 which encourages brain function and helps to maintain heart and artery health. Eating this everyday and keeping the red meat to a minimum is wonderful for the cardiovascular system. Fresh little parcels of fish and vegetables often come wrapped in seaweed. In fact, the Japanese eat seaweed everyday in some form. This super food contains more minerals than any other vegetable you’re likely to find growing on land. It prevents cancer, heart disease and blood clots and also kills bacteria. But perhaps Japan’s overall health can attributed equally to what they don’t eat. The traditional Japanese diet is blissfully devoid of sugar and dairy products and very low in red meat. So grab some mohashi and have a tasty time. Itadakimasu. To see if you’re suffering from job burnout, complete some of the free questionnaires available online.

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